Three Seniors Compete B.A.A. Marathon

Three seniors, led by William H. Chrisman, 2nd '55, completed the 59th annual Boston Marathon yesterday, but a freshman and a Divinity School student were forced to drop out.

Chrisman, a three-year veteran of the event, finished 78the in his best time of 3:28.38. The other Crimson finishers, Marshall r. Childs '55 and James J. Pates, Jr. '55, placed 115th and 121st respectively. Richard L. Arthur of the divinity school dropped out at the 23-mile mark.

Perhaps the most amazing feat of the day, however, was turned in the Frederic P. Anderson '58. Anderson, who has never gone out for track, suddenly decided to enter the Marathon about a week ago. On Saturday he took his first warm-up session and jogged five miles around the athletic fields. Thus prepared, he managed to complete 21 miles of the gruelling course until he "just couldn't take another stop." A kingly spectator drove him the rest of the way in to the finish line.

Both Chrisman and Pates, who finished 88th and 99th last year, improved their times, but an unusually strong field kept them far down in the rankings. Pates cut 45 minutes off his time, but dropped 22 places to the 121st position. Hideo Hamamura of Japan won the race with a record-breaking 2:18.23.

Childs, a member of the Board of Directors of WHRB, caused a slight stir when he showed in his WHRB polo shirt. A newcomer to the track world, Childs entered the Marathon because he thought it was the "last stronghold of heroism left in America." He also said he liked to watch the crowds and the scenery along the route.

Other motives for entering ranged from Arthur's desire "to have an American winner this year" to Chrisman's urge to keep himself physically and mentally fit. Anderson didn't really know why he entered.

The rain which fell during the first part of the race did little to retard the runners. Chrisman's urge to keep himself physically and mentally fit. Anderson didn't really know why he entered.

The rain which fell during the first part of the race did little to retard the runners. Chrisman said it made his uniform slightly uncomfortable, but Pates and Anderson felt it did them a service by cooling them down. "It rained hard enough to get wet, but not hard enough to get a drink." Childs complained after ward.

Armos Kujala, a mysterious entrant listed as representing Harvard University, failed to cross the finish line. The University Information Office was unable to identify him.