British Conservatives in Trouble As Labor Gains Public Support; U.N. Forces Occupy Gaza Strip

LONDON, March 8--Prime Minister Harold Macmillan's government is in serious trouble with the British electorate.

With gasoline rationing dragging on and the cost of living rising, the tide of public opinion is flowing toward the Laborites for the first time since they were swept out of power in 1951.

Five special parliamentary elections in the last few weeks have shown an anti-government swing of between five and six per cent in the voting, enough to put the Laborities back in power with a majority of 100 seats in the House of Commons if the trend were maintained.

The Conservatives lost a seat to Labor in one of the contests.

Israeli Troops Withdraw

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y., March 8--Dag Hammarskjold told the U.N. Assembly today all Israeli troops have withdrawn from Egypt and the Gaza Strip. He then began work on the next task of peace-keeping thereabouts.

U.S. Chief Delegate Henry Cabot Lodge hailed the day's developments as a turn away from war.

Speaking as the Assembly resumed debate on the Middle East situation, Lodge pledged U.S. support "to assure that what has now been achieved will be used as a foundation on which to build a good future for the people of the Near East free from danger of conflict."

Perjury Charge

WASHINGTON, March 8--Conflicting testimony by Mayor Terry Schrunk of Portland, Ore., and six other witnesses about an alleged $500 bribe was referred to the Justice Department today for "possible perjury prosecution."

The move was ordered by Chairman McClellan (D-Ark.) of the special Senate committee investigating rackets.