Pusey Stops Plan to Build Dorm Near JFK Library

University officials have refused to allot more land to the Kennedy library because they object strongly to Kennedy family plans for use of the extra space, it was learned yesterday.

The Kennedys wanted the additional land, which borders on Western Avenue, as a site for dormitory facilities for the scholars who will be doing research at the Institute connected with the library.

But, according to sources in Washington, President Pusey made known his opposition to the idea even before it was formally proposed by Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

University officials believe that all scholars studying at the Institute should live at Harvard, preferably in the Houses, but at least in apartments in Cambridge.

The University objects strongly to the creation of an elite group of scholars which would spend all of its time at the Library, and have no connection with Harvard.

Harvard's reluctance to let Institute scholars be housed near the Kennedy Library is one facet of a tension that has slowly been building between University officials and members of the late President's family.

The University tends to regard the Library like any other center at Harvard. University officials hope to integrate all Library activities into the Harvard curriculum as much as possible.

The Kennedy's, however, have dedicated their efforts to building a monument to President Kennedy. Harvard's specific needs and desires are not always included in their plans, say Harvard observers.

Some University officials consider the tension healthy and believe that it will eventually produce a better Library and Institute. But such controversies as that over who would conduct the oral taping project and the current problem of dormitory space adjacent to the Library are bound to recur.