Tealeaves and Taurus

The CRIMSON received its annual shipment of fortune cookies from Sinkiang Province yesterday with a Happy Chanukah note attached. Sifting through the crumbs, the editors found these messages for the coming year:

JANUARY

President Pusey agrees to admit Radcliffe students to Lamont Library, but Radcliffe President Mary Ingraham Bunting vetoes the proposal. "Activities in Lamont will not be properly supervised unless I'm allowed to move next door," she says.

FEBRUARY

President Pusey resigns in protest as he returns from a holiday weekend to find Mrs. Bunting ensconced in the President's mansion. Ronald Reagan, Republican candidate for governor of California, proposes to raze 40 blocks of central Watts and replace them with Disneyland. "Those people just want to be happy," he says.

MARCH

Mao Tse-tung is reportedly near death after suffering a major heart attack. Polls show Ronald Reagan's lead in the California gubernatorial race declining. Reagan grows a beard, loses 40 pounds, and begins a series of ten-minute addresses at grand openings of Forest Lawn Cemetary branches. The Fellows of Harvard College and their wives attend a tea given by Mrs. Bunting at her new home. Soon after, Mrs. Helen Gurley Brown, author of "Sex and the Single Girl," is appointed first mistress of the tenth House, Ingraham House. Mrs. Brown is a non-academic. As nights become warmer and rumors fly, Harvard freshmen nervously sandbag entrances to the yard.

APRIL

In a well-organized riot, the entire student bodies of Radcliffe College, Lesley College, and the Longy School of Music assault the Yard and herd all freshmen into waiting trucks with all their belongings except their pants. The girls put on the pants. New York Mayor John V. Lindsay uncovers an eternal spring of fresh water by striking his rod against the Empire State Building. Ronald Reagan engages California Governor Edmund G. (Pat) Brown in a series of debates. Reagan, clasping his shawl tight to his shoulders, persists in calling Brown "Senator Douglas" and talking about his boyhood in Illinois.

MAY

Pop singer Daumyn O'Theerie rockets to fame with his controversial recording of "Don't Ya Negotiate, Baby." Thousands of wives and girlfriends of newly drafted servicemen buy the record. Lyrics include: Don't ya negotiate, baby,  I just don't know what to think, babe, Like them creeples say to do.  'Bout them pacificisters and such. Let our love burn like napalm, baby;  We're keepin' US offs the brink, babe, Let it tingle like Asian flu.  And, oh yeah, I love ya so much.

JUNE

New York Mayor John V. Lindsay, playing a flute, leads all the rats out of Harlem. Authoritative sources say Mao Tse-tung is dying after an attack of German measles. For the 21st time, Harvard fails to award an honorary degree to Harry S Truman. Honorary degrees are awarded to Margaret Truman: "She rose from obscurity to musical eminence," Thomas E. Dewey: "A stunning campaigner, a flawless Chief Executive," and to 22 people chosen at random from the Boston telephone directory.

JULY