Faculty Will Meet Today To Decide ROTC's Fate

The Faculty--with specially-invited students attending for the first time in Harvard's history--will meet today to decide what to do about ROTC.

Four separate ROTC proposals are docketed for discussion today, and several professors say that they may bring up other motions from the floor at the meeting.

Nine students--three each from the HUC, the HRPC, and the SFAC--will attend the meeting and join in the discussion. Dean Ford, who asked the three groups to name representatives last month, said that the students will have "the same prerogatives as Faculty members," except for the right to vote, at the meeting.

On the Docket

The four motions definitely on the docket for discussion are:

* The SFAC resolution--to be presented by Rogers Albritton, professor of Philosophy--which asks the Faculty to remove ROTC's academic credit and to deny ROTC instructors their Corporation appointments;

* The HUC resolution--to be presented by Edward Wilcox, director of General Education--which calls for virtually the same action as SFAC proposes;

* The CEP resolution--to be presented by James Q. Wilson, professor of Government--which would force ROTC courses to re-apply individually for credit through existing Harvard departments;

* The SDS resolution--to be presented by Hilary Putnam, professor of Philosophy--which seeks ROTC's total banishment from campus.

In addition to these four motions, Seymour Martin Lipset, professor of Government and Social Relations, said he may introduce a proposal backed by the Young People's Socialist League (YPSL) calling for a student referendum on ROTC's future.

HRPC Representatives

Last night Kenneth M. Kaufman '69, chairman of HRPC, named his group's three representatives to the meeting. They will be Scott Present '69--author of the HRPC's final report on ROTC last fall, Jay Epstein '69--who worked with Present on early drafts of the report-- and Mary K. Tolbert '69. The SFAC and HUC representatives were announced earlier this week.

Two student groups that were not invited to the meeting--SDS and YPSL--yesterday objected to the student representation plan. SDS is calling for a protest march outside Sanders Theatre when the Faculty begins its meeting there at 3 p.m. today. But SDS members--who led the Dec. 12 sit-in that forced cancellation of the last Faculty meeting slated to discuss ROTC--say they do not plan to obstruct today's meeting.

The ten-man executive committee of YPSL last night released a statement asking that at least one student supporter of YPSL's referendum plan be admitted to the meeting. The statement claimed that the nine invited students "are not representative of the student body," and that YPSL's stand has "the most demonstrated support in the student body."

Lipset said yesterday that he is "fairly definite" in his plans to present his motion--the same one YPSL backs--today. But he may decide not to offer the motion if the Faculty seems ready to vote on one of the other proposals, he said.