Jung Lures Yale's Provost

Charles H. Taylor Jr., Yale University's provost and recent acting president, resigned Monday to start a new career as a psychologist. Taylor's decision represents an abrupt shift from his present career as a high-ranking administrator and English literature professor.

Taylor said Monday, "I would not wish anyone to stress frustrations in explaining, this decision....I undertake a new career not because I don't like what I am now doing, but because a new interest in Jung now appeals to me even more than the interests I have pursued before."

Although firmly entrenched in Yale's hierarchy, and often mentioned as President Kingman Brewster's probable successor, Taylor--43 years old--will begin from scratch in his new field. After his resignation takes effect at the end of June, Taylor will maintain ties to Yale only by assisting, part time, in a planned fund drive.

His primary concern will be studies in psychology at the New York Institute of the C.G. Jung Foundation.

The news came as a great surprise to most of the university, but Taylor's family and friends said the decision has been long in the making.

A faculty member who has worked closely with Taylor in the administration said, "It is not hard to explain, given Charlie's pastoral streak, his deep religious and spiritual commitment, his intense interest in the interpersonal, relations of the young, and his interest in literature as a human statement rather than only as a historical record."