Freshmen Receive House Assignments

Prankster Plagues Holworthy

Freshmen will receive their housing assignments today between 8 a.m. and noon, Thomas A. Dingman, member of the Board of Freshmen Advisers said last night.

Freshmen whose name appeared first on housing applications will receive notification for their entire rooming group in letters distributed to their doors, Dingman said.

The Freshman Dean's Office delayed the announcement of Housing assignments a day because many freshman turned in their applications late, and Houses were slow in completing their resident lists for next year, Susan A. Neer, housing officer, said yesterday.

Surprise

Some Holworthy residents, however, received phony housing assignments yesterday morning printed on sheets similar to those the Freshman Dean's Office will distribute.

Henning P. Guttman '82 described the computer printed notices as "official-looking," but said residents began to suspect a hoax when someone who had listed Currier as his top choice received an assingnment to Winthrop.

The printouts read "According to our records you have been assigned to the house listed above. Please call the Office of the Dean of the College (495-4969) if you have any questions."

The Wrong Dish

"I was very worried until I called the number and got an answer from Harvard Food Services," Raymond T. Chung '82 who was separated from his rooming group and assigned to a single in North House, said yesterday.

Edward J. Davis '82, assigned to Quincy, his first choice, said he hoped to be as lucky in the real lottery.

"I think they were really dumb," Charles J. Lowenstein '82, said yesterday. He said one resident took the prank seriously and was very upset until he went to the Freshman Dean's Office and discovered it was a hoax.

Holworthy students suspect that either Thayer, the Lampoon, proctor Jeffrey A. Sonnenfeld or residents familiar with the computer were responsible for the prank.

"It had to be an inside job," Kevin K. Gaines '82, a Holworthy resident, said yesterday.

"I don't know enough about computers to be able to do something like that," Sonnenfeld said yesterday. "It would be really dumb for a proctor to go and make extra work for himself," he said.