Harvard vs. Cambridge

THE MAIL

To the Editors of The Crimson:

It's nice to know that Harvard officials are so much in tune with the seemingly never-ending series of hostilities between the University and the community of which it is a part. The Crimson of 4/16 reports that the city may hike water and sewerage rates for the University--a necessary step given the drastic effect of Propostition 2 1/2 on the Cambridge budget, but a step which the city council must relish taking. Why? Because time and again Harvard officials have shown their lack of consideration for the non-Harvard-affiliated people who deal with the University on a daily basis.

One need not look far to find an example of this lack of consideration. The article directly below the rate hike story mentions that "...University officials refused permission for the triangular yard in front of Kirkland House..." as a possible site for a proposed college-wide rock concert to be held April 26. The alternative site is the Radcliffe Quad, for which Dean Epps has already given his approval. However, the Quad is located in the midst of a residential neighborhood, and any loud rock concert on a Sunday afternoon would surely be annoying to some of the Quad's neighbors. The K-House triangle, on the other hand, is bordered by three University houses and the IAB. This patch of dirt that the University annually prunes to golf course lushness (just in time for the alumni's June arrival) would be an ideal place for such a concert: any excess noise would disturb only Harvard students. Other possible sites, the river bank next to Weld boat house, or Soldiers' Field Park, appear not to have even been considered. By allowing the concert to be held at one of these sites, the University would neatly avoid another potential confrontation.

Harvard officials once again are showing their lack of respect for the surrounding community. This decision and others like it can only serve to push the already uncomfortable co-existence between Cambridge and Harvard toward more serious conflict. Ben Rosenberg '81   Cambridge resident