Keeping Track

A tight academic job market, rising tuition rates and looming cuts in financial aid may have scared educational analysts and put fear in the hearts of many college officials, but it didn't deter many of this year's applicants to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS).

The percentage of students who accepted admission to the school rose slightly this year--going from 50 to 51 percent. The total enrollment will increase from 418 to 421.

University officials said they were particularly pleased by an unexpectedly large number of prospective humanities students.

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A casual observer strolling through the Yard on the morning after housing assignments arrive would think the Quad the last place in Cambridge to have a housing shortage.

But after housing lotteries were conducted at North and Currier Houses last week, about 60 students were left without housing assignments for next year.

Although College officials are not yet sure what will be done with the students, they may be housed in "ec-doubles," the Jordan Cooperatives, or converted lounges and storage rooms.

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The Harvard Campaign approached the $195 million mark last week and is expected to pass $200 million before the end of the month. If all goes as planned, Development Office officials said they will announce a new goal of $350 million around Commencement.

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Members of an informal undergraduate group that has proposed a professional race relations counseling program for students said last week that John B. Fox '59, dean of the College, was "quite receptive" to the idea and has agreed to fund research on the program over the summer.

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About 150 people set aside reading period assignments and braved the rain last Monday night to rally in favor of a freeze on U.S. and Soviet nuclear arms production at a spirited demonstration at the Science Center.

The Harvard demonstration, sponsored by a coalition of nine campus groups, was one of several regional protests, including a Mothers Day rally on the Boston Common which drew about 2000 people.

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