Scoreboard

TODAY'S GAMES

Football v. Cornell, 1:30 p.m., the Stadium

Men's soccer v. Cornell, 11 a.m., Ohiri Field

Field hockey v. Cornell, 11 a.m., Soldiers Field

Women's soccer v. Cornell, 11 a.m., Ohiri Field

Women's tennis v. William and Mary, 2 p.m., Palmer Dixon Courts

Men's golf at Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference finals

Men's tennis at Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference tournament at Princeton

Men's tennis at University of Vermont

Men's water polo at Eastern Water Polo Association Tournament at Brown

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS

Dartmouth 26, men's cross-country 31

Women's cross-country 26, Dartmouth 31

Detroit 5, San Diego 2

DETROIT--Detroit benefited from a record-tying 11 walks, as San Diego's starting pitching failed once again, and light-hitting Marty Castillo homered to lead the Tigers to a 5-2 victory in Game Three of the 1984 World Series.

The victory, which went to Tigers right-hander Milt Wilcox, gave Detroit a 2-1 lead in games in the best-of-7 Series, which continues here Saturday and Sunday.

But it took a specutacular twisting catch in dead center field by Chet Lemon to end San Diego's final hope in the seventh inning.

Castillo, who had only four home runs during the season, hit a two-run homer as Detroit scored four times in the second inning with the help of three walks, two off starter Tim Lollar and another off reliever Greg Booker.

The game also marked the end of the San Diego bullpen's domination of Detroit. When Booker allowed a third inning run, it snapped a string of 13-1-3 consecutive innings during which the Padres bullpen had held Detroit scoreless.

Going back to San Diego's five-game National League playoff victory over Chicago, the bullpen had gone 22 innings without giving up a run. Booker gave up the run after with walking the bases full, and San Diego's third pitcher, Greg Harris, hit Kirk Gibson in the foot with a pitch.

"It's the worst thing that can happen in my job," San Diego pitching coach Norm Sherry said. "There's no way you can tell a pitcher not to walk a guy, and there's no way to defense a base on balls."