Tutor Discusses Ethnic Studies

After an eight-month campaign by campus minority organizations to formalize ethnic studies in the curriculum, the head tutor of special concentrations met with students last night and distributed information on pursuing an ethnic studies program.

The booklet, compiled by the Ethnic Studies Committee, is the only booklet ever compiled as a guide to a particular special concentration, according to Garth McCavana, head tutor of special concentrations.

The guide, given to potential concentrators, lists programs in departments such as Afro-American Studies and Folklore and Mythology that could be applied toward an ethnic studies special concentration.

McCavana warned students, however, that limited course offerings will make it difficult for students to focus their studies on any particular ethnicity. Like all special concentrators, ethnic studies concentrators must complete 14 credits for general studies and 17 credits to graduate with honors.

The meeting last night marks a high point in a movement begun last March to push for an ethnic studies concentration, as well as increased minority faculty hiring and "an official investigation into the role of institutionalized racism." About nine campus minority organizations mobilized behind the slate of issues, forming the Coalition for Diversity.

Despite the recognition of ethnic studies as a special concentration, however, student leaders at the meeting said efforts to formalize ethnic studies into a regular concentration will continue.

"Our efforts do not stop here," said Amy C. Tang '94, co-chair of theeducational/political committee of Asian AmericanAssociation (AAA). "AAA will continue itscommitment to support ethnic studies and minorityfaculty hiring."

Richard Garcia '95, spokesperson for thecoalition, said last night that the coalition hasnot yet met this year to decide if it willcontinue its efforts to make ethnic studies aregular concentration.

The meeting was organized by Tang and Peggy H.Nguyen '94 in conjunction with AAA