At Harvard Daily Entertainment & Events

November Thursday

Concert

Lunchtime Organ Recitals. Murray Forbes Somerville. Adolphus Busch Hall, 12:15 p.m. Free.

Exhibitions

Busch-Reisinger Museum. Through Dec. 12. "The Sketchbooks of George Grosz." Exploring the many sides of the former dada activist through more than 80 of his previously unexhibited sketchbooks.

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts. Through Nov. 15. "Works and Texts: Twenty-Five Proofs and Nine Screen-prints." Featuring works by Tom Phillips from Dante's Inferno.

Fogg Art Museum. Through Nov. 14: "American Painting at Mid-Century: Highlights from a Private Collection." Considers the vital moment in history of avant-garde painting in New York by artists such as Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Willem de Kooning and Frank Stella.

Through Nov. 11: "Portrait, Prospect and Poetry: British Drawings from the Grenville L. Winthrop Bequest." Featuring works by artists such as William Blake, Aubrey Beardsley and John Constable.

Through Jan. 6: "The Art of Time: Clocks, Watches, and Other Timepieces from Harvard Collections." Includes many historically significant pieces seldom seen in public. The inner works of timepieces will be displayed outside the case to help viewers appreciate the clockmakers' art.

Through Jan. 9. "An Offbeat Collection of Dutch and Flemish Paintings." Featuring 20 works from the 16th-and 17th century Netherlands, all drawn from a private collection.

Sackler Museum. Through Jan. 23: "Buddhist Art: The Later Tradition." A survey of Buddhist art from the 8th through the 18th centuries, emphasizing works from China, Korea and Japan but also including ones from Nepal and Tibet.

Through Nov. 21: "Rothko's Harvard Murals." Five monumental abstract murals painted for the University.

Schlesinger Library. Through Dec. 3: "Votes for Women: An Exhibition of Suffrage Posters." Original British and American suffrage movement posters.

Film

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center. $5 for students. "Primate" at 7 p.m. This film presents the daily activities of Yerkes Primate Research Center. Scientists in the film are concerned with studying the physical and mental development of primates. Some of the experimental work shown in the film deals with the capacity to learn, remember and apply language and manual skills, the effect of alcohol and drugs on behavior, the control of aggressive and sexual behavior and other neural and physiological determinants of behavior.

"Toni" and "A Day in the Country" at 7:30 p.m. "Toni" is one of the most realistic of Jean Renoir's films depicting the life of a group of Italian immigrants working in a quarry. Shot in an authentic environment, with newsreel-like photography, without any makeup on the actors' faces, the film is experienced as a documents "as close as possible to everyday life." "A Day in the Country" is an unfinished masterpiece, based on Guy de Maupassant's short story. It captures the atmosphere and fashions of 1880 through glorious shot compositions and in inspired by the canvasses of great impressionist painters.

"Tous les matins du monde" at 10 p.m. Structured as the reminiscences of the famed court composer and violinist Martin Marais, the film tells the story of two 17th century virtuosi, the reclusive Monsieur de Sainte Colombe and his student Marais, who played and wrote music for the viola da gamba. When Sainte Colombe discovers the love affair between his daughter Madeleine and Marais, he banishes Marais from his household and mentorship-to no avail.

Reception

Bienvenidos/Welcome to the Class of 1997. Welcoming reception for Latino and other students of the Class of 1997. This annual reception introduces first year students to the resources at the College for Latino students.

Talk

"Chernobyl Revisited: Myths, On-Site Findings, and Their Implications." Alexander Sich, Ph.D. candidate in nuclear engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Seminar Room, URI, 1583 Mass Ave., 4 p.m.

"Architecture and the Creative Process." Discussion with professional architects and related professionals. Bunting Institute, 5:30 p.m. Free, but advance registration is requested. Call Alexandra Antic at 868-3282 for more information.

"Struggles for Life and Justice: Feminist Theology from Latin American Women." Maria Pilar Aquino, professor, theological and religious studies, University of San Diego. Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 5 p.m.

Theatre

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Through Nov. 28. By Edward Albee. This dazzling comedy presents one of the most memorable of married couples George and Martha-in a searing night of dangerous fun and games with their two guests, Nick and Honey, who innocently become their foil. Hasty Pudding Theatre, 8 p.m. $19-$32. Call 496-8400 for tickets and more information.

Deathrap. By Ira Levin. Produced by Bill Selig and Ada Lin. Directed by Kaile Shilling. A thriller in two acts. Juicy murder in Act One, unexpected developments in Act Two. So begins Deathtrap, written by a burned out mystery playwright. Or one of his students. With help from the worried wife, lawyer, and psychic next door, the tension builds in this suspenseful, intricate murder romp. Loeb Experimental Theatre, 7:30 p.m. Free. November Friday

Art Exhibition

"Expressions of a Universal Soul," by Carlo Mejia, Salvadoran contemporary artist. Dudley House Common Room. Reception to meet the artist at 6:30 p.m.

The exhibition will be on view through Nov. 30.Call 496-4006 for more information.

Film

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center.$5 for students. "Balamos" at 7 p.m. Taking thefilm's title from the language of the gypsies, thestory deals with the protagonist who is "balamos,"meaning condemned to wander forever. Whilesearching for the magic horse, he rides into theworld of the imagination, where the dimensions oftime and space lose their conventionalsignificance. Transformed into a vampire thatdrinks horse's blood, he travels in antiquity. Hebecomes a prophet and a slave before climbingMount Olympus. The exceptional poetic images erasethe line between reality and fantasy.

"Rembetiko" at 9 p.m. The fictionalizedbiography of a popular Greek singer provides adistinctive look at the events that played animportant role in Greek history in the first partof the twentieth century. "Like Water forChocolate" at 8 and 10 p.m. in Science Center B.

Ice Skating

An Evening with Champions. Ice skatingexhibition to benefit the Jimmy Fund and theDana-Farber Cancer Institute. With host PaulWylie. Bright Hockey Center, 8 p.m. $20 foradults. $10 for undergraduate students, seniorsand children under 12. Call 493-8172 or 493-8173for more information.

Theatre

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ThroughNov. 28. By Edward Albee. Hasty Pudding Theatre, 8p.m. $19-$32. Call 496-8400 for tickets and moreinformation.

Deathrap. By Ira Levin. LoebExperimental Theatre, 7:30 and 10 p.m. Free.6 November Saturday

Concert

Radcliffe Choral Society. Perform As theTrees Let Go Their Leaves. Sanders Theatre, 8 p.m.$5 for students.

Film

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center.$5 for students. "Loafing and Camouflage" at 7p.m. A most humorous presentation of a difficultperiod during the first months of 1967 in Greece,exerting laughter as the natural reaction tooppression and loss of freedom. With aconsiderable biographical element, the filmnarrates the antics of a group of soldiers who aredoing their military service in a televisionstation belonging to the Armed Forces. Pregnantwith satire and grotesque situations, the film wasone of the biggest popular successes of thecontemporary Greek cinema, after the fall of thecolonies.

"Sweet Bunch" at 9 p.m. The diary of the lifeand death of a group of young misfits who turn anold mansion into a commune, while under thesurveillance of an undefined authoritarian group.The film involves four amoral heroes consciouslyabandoning social rites, while seeking thegreatest possible freedom, companionship and truelove, eventually choosing their own means ofdeath.

Film

"Like Water for Chocolate" at 8 and 10 p.m. inScience Center B.

Ice Skating

An Evening with Champions. Bright HockeyCenter, 8 p.m. $20 for adults. $10 forundergraduate students, seniors and children under12. Call 493-8172 or 493-8173 for moreinformation.

Theatre

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ThroughNov. 28. By Edward Albee. Hasty Pudding Theatre, 5and 9 p.m. $19-$32. Call 496-8400 for tickets andmore information.

Deathtrap.By Ira Levin. LoebExperimental Theatre, 7:30 p.m. Free.7 November Sunday

Concert

Iris Dement. Folk singer. Sanders Theatre, 7p.m. $19.

Film

Harvard-Epworth Film Series. YasujiroOzu's "The Only Son," 8 p.m. Harvard-EpworthUnited Methodist Church, 1555 Mass Ave. $3.

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center.$5 for students. "The Photograph" at 3 and 9 p.m.Another allegorical depiction of the politicalreality in Greece during the militarydictatorship. Young llias finds himself in Pariswhere, working with solitary Gerasimus, he learnsthe art of the furrier. The old emigrant falls inlove with the unknown young girl appearing on apost card sent to llias from Greece. They bothlong to return home-for different reasons-whilecontinuing to live together in Paris, developing anew relationship which turns into a modern versionof an ancient Greek tragedy. The search forFelicity gradually leads to crime and catastrophe,reflecting the inhuman aspect of the politicalstruggle in Greece.

"Topos" at 7 p.m. A woman gives birth and dies.As in a dream, the protagonist's descent intounconscious begins, while images deep in memoryrise to the surface, and the protagonist is tornby the demons inhabiting it.

Ice Skating

An Evening with Champions. Bright HockeyCenter, 1 p.m. $20 for adults. $10 forundergraduate students, seniors and children under12. Call 493-8172 or 493-8173 for moreinformation.

Theatre

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ThroughNov. 28. By Edward Albee. Hasty Pudding Theatre, 2and 7 p.m. $19-$32. Call 496-8400 for tickets andmore information.8 November Monday

Film

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center.$5 for students. "The Grand Illusion" at 5:30 p.m.Banned in Germany and Italy at the time of itsrelease, the film-even though set during the FirstWorld War- anticipates World War II.

"Je, tu, il, elle" at 7:30 p.m. Chantal Akermanstars as a young woman alienated and abandoned,who struggles from the solitary "je" (I) in thefirst section through a casual but tenderencounter with "il" (He) in the second andculminating in the passionate embrace of "elle"(She) in the third. "Tu" (you) is the viewer.

"Deep Hearts/The Making of Serpent" at 9:30p.m. "Deep Hearts" is an essay in describing anoccasion during the rainy season when twodifferent lineages meet to choose the most perfectBororo male. "The Making of Serpent" isavant-gardist Scott Bartlett's reexamination ofthe ways and means of the production of "Serpent."10 November Tuesday

Concert

Organ Recitals at Harvard. Jaroslav Tuma of thePrague Conservatory. Memorial Church, 7:30 p.m. $4for students.

Film

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center. $5 forstudents. "News from Home" at 5:30 p.m. Shots ofNew York streets are accompanied by the voice-overof Chantal Akerman as she reads letters from hermother.

"Angel and Sinner" at 7:30 p.m. The film is setduring the Franco-Prussian War of 1870. The superblandscape photography serves as a dramaticbackground for the diverse factual characters andtheir conflicts.

"Bicycle Thieves" at 8 p.m. The film usesauthentic environments and nonprofessional actors,in the spirit of Italian Neorealsim. Ricci, anunemployed man in Rome, finds work posting bills,but the bicycle he needs to keep his job isstolen.

"Balamos" at 9:30 p.m. Taking the film's titlefrom the language of the gypsies, the story dealswith the protagonist who is "balamos," meaningcondemned to wander forever. While searching forthee magic horse, he rides into the world of theimagination. Transformed into a vampire thatdrinks horse's blood, he travels in antiquity. Hebecomes a prophet and a slave before climbingMount Olympus. The exceptional poetic images erasethe line between reality and fantasy.

Theatre

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ThroughNov. 28. By Edward Albee. Hasty Pudding Theatre, 8p.m. $19-$32. Call 496-8400 for tickets and moreinformation.10 November Wednesday

Film

Harvard Film Archive. Carpenter Center.$5 for students. "Man of Marble" at 5 p.m. Anaggressive young woman filmmaker sets out tounravel the life of a now-forgotten figure whobecame a celebrity in the Stalinist 1950s.

"Rome, Open City" at 7:30 p.m. Shot underextremely difficult conditions at the end of WorldWar II, the film is one of the seminal works ofItalian Neorealism.

"Evdokia" at 9:30 p.m. A drama of passion, inwhich main characters are a sergeant and aprostitute who get married after a briefpassionate idyll.

Theatre

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ThroughNov. 28. By Edward Albee. Hasty Pudding Theatre, 8p.m. $19-$32. Call 496-8400 for tickets and moreinformation