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Frosh Union Cable TV Approved by Council

The Undergraduate Council approved plans last night to install cable television in the Harvard Union and to seek bike paths around the Cambridge commons. It also passed a measure recommending that the Faculty Council make it more difficult for students to waive their council term-bill fees.

The council allocated $600 towards the $1000 cost of installing cable television in the Union and paying nine months worth of user fees. The rest of the money will come from funds allocated earlier in the year for durable goods projects benefiting first-years.

"Hopefully, by the end of the year, the FDO [Freshman Dean's Office] will pay for it," said Secretary Randall A. Fine '96, who presented the resolution. Fine said the council should view the installation as "a start to get [cable] into all the houses."

However, some members questioned the popularity of putting cable in the Union. "Who the hell is going to go to this? [My answer is] no one," said Alan M. Grumet '93-'94.

The council voted unanimously to present to the Faculty Council a recommendation requiring students to submit a written request for a refund of the Undergraduate Council Fee.

The measure is an attempt to make it more difficult for students to waive their $20 council fee. At pre- students can check off a box on the term bill to get most of the fee.

Cambridge Bike Paths

The council unanimously passed a resolution to present to the Cambridge City Council a proposed bike path along the perimeter of the Commons bordering Mass. Ave. Currently it is against city ordinances for students to ride their bikes through the Commons.

Last fall the City Council had considered voting on an ordinance to fine bicyclists $50, but later tabled the matter after opposition from the Undergraduate Council.

The entire council also approved $1350 to sponsor shuttle buses to the airport on March 26 and March 27 for spring recess and $30 to print 3,000 business size cards listing security phone numbers.

The council allocated $120 for a poll of about 4,000 students to measure student opinion about the current academic schedule and possible calendar reforms such as holding fall exams before winter recess