Letters

Colby Correctly Praises Mt. Auburn Environs

To the editors:

I just wanted to say I enjoyed reading Edward B. Colby's article on my "Mt. Auburn" neighborhood (News, May 3). It's a great neighborhood and I love living there. I have the Mt. Auburn cemetery to walk, friendly neighbors and I'm close to work. It a neighborhood that bands together in time of need. I've been to many fundraisers at Guido's, which by the way has great food. In the summer there is an Italian Santa Lucia festival Labor Day weekend on Cushing Street, if you're around check it out--it shows the neighborhood in a festive mood.

Janet DiBenedetto

May 4, 2000

The writer is a staff assistant in the Harvard University Dining Services Directors Office.

Vieques Issue Resolved For Most in Puerto Rico

To the editors:

Vieques protests, like that in Boston last weekend (News, May 8),.represent the thoughts of a noisy but microscopic minority of just 4 percent of Puerto Rico residents. The majority accept the hard-fought arrangement negotiated by Governor Rosell and President Clinton for the eventual exit of the Navy in 3 years.

There are continuous protests not because they care about Vieques but because the Puerto Rican Independence Party has used this issue to tire the U.S. of its colony and advance their desire for independence against the wishes of more than 90 percent of Puerto Ricans.

Jos Coln

Moca, Puerto Rico

May 8, 2000

Seltzer's Tenure is For Work, Not Gender

To the editors:

Your article on Margo I. Seltzer '83 (News, May 4) was offensive for its blatant sexism. I can't recall an article about a male tenured professor that focused on his family life and devoted only two sentences to his work.

Seltzer did not get tenure because she can raise a child, she got tenure because of the quality of her work, which deserves some mention. You have belittled her accomplishment and judged her as "woman" and not as a scientist. Male professors have children who are important to them, and Seltzer has had a different experience because of her gender. This should not, however, be her defining characteristic.

Lauren E. Hough '00

May 5, 2000