Graduate Schools Consider Space Needs

The Physical Planning Committee has presented, among other options, a proposal to develop Allston into a professional school campus to allow greater cooperation among Harvard’s different schools.

The Law School has taken the lead in planning for an Allston move with its Locational Options Committee.

Meanwhile, most of the other schools strapped for space have begun considering expansion and the possibility of a move across the river to Harvard’s new frontier.

Graduate School of Education

The Graduate School of Education (GSE), is often mentioned as the top candidate for an Allston move.

According to Shattuck Professor of Education Catherine E. Snow, GSE’s representative on the University’s Physical Planning Committee, the school has nowhere to expand around its present campus and is currently forced to rent space in order to accommodate its needs.

GSE has been unable to formally consider an Allston move, however, because the school’s efforts have been directed toward the search for a new dean to replace Jerome T. “Jerry” Murphy, who left in June 2001.

“We still have some institutional items we need to work out first, like who will lead the school,” Snow says.

“Planning isn’t that central on our radar.”

The Allston move is still high on its agenda after pressure from University President Lawrence H. Summers, according to Snow.

“We have to do something about space and we are landlocked more than other schools,” Snow says.

“A year ago this was not on such a fast track as it is now. President Summers wants to speed it up,” she says.

The Kennedy School

The Kennedy School of Government (KSG) is similarly starved for space.

The school has rented space for many years and 30 percent of the its students and faculty work outside of the campus’s main courtyard, according to Jesus Mena, director of the KSG office of communications and public affairs.

The school has no immediate plans to convene a formal committee to consider the Allston move.