Obama Disses Harvard, Pushes Clean Energy

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God bless the USA! POTUS does his thang.

President Barack Obama flew into Logan airport, visited a bunch of famous MIT professors, and pushed for the passage of his energy and climiate bill at MIT this morning. Oh, and he dissed Harvard, much to FlyBy's chagrin.

It's always been a dream of mine to visit the most prestigious school in Cambridge, Massachusetts. [Boooooo.] Hold on a second--certainly the most prestigious school in this part of Cambridge, Massachusetts. [POTUS redeems himself, sort of.] And I'll probably be here for a while -- I understand a bunch of engineering students put my motorcade on top of Building 10.

If the POTUS came to the most prestigious school in all of Cambridge instead, we would have shown him a good time -- and probably wouldn't have handed him a copy of the periodic table the size of a business card. Plus, Al Gore's visit last year is testament to the fact that Green is the new Crimson.

FlyBy's huffiness at being passed over for the second best school in Cambridge, Mass. aside, Obama gave a fantastically crisp 15-minute speech on the importance of clean energy. He also called out the fools who don't believe in clean energy and the "folks" who have been lobbying against the energy and climate bill. And then he left. Off to something important like Deval Patrick's fundraiser. Too bad his motorcade wasn't actually displaced to the top of Building 10 so we could have him around longer.

Notables spotted at the event. Senator John Kerry shaking hands in the front row, Congressman Michael Capuano handing out business cards, and Cambridge Mayor Denise Simmons striding into Kresge Auditorium with a gaggle of city councilmen.

Check out Monday's Crimson for full coverage of the event.

Full text of the speech after the jump.

Thank you very much. Please, have a seat. Thank you. Thank you, MIT. (Applause.) I am -- I am hugely honored to be here. It's always been a dream of mine to visit the most prestigious school in Cambridge, Massachusetts. (Applause.) Hold on a second -- certainly the most prestigious school in this part of Cambridge, Massachusetts. (Laughter.) And I'll probably be here for a while -- I understand a bunch of engineering students put my motorcade on top of Building 10. (Laughter.)

This tells you something about MIT -- everybody hands out periodic tables. (Laughter.) What's up with that? (Laughter.)

I want I want to thank all of you for the warm welcome and for the work all of you are doing to generate and test new ideas that hold so much promise for our economy and for our lives. And in particular, I want to thank two outstanding MIT professors, Eric Lander, a person you just heard from, Ernie Moniz, for their service on my council of advisors on science and technology. And they have been hugely helpful to us already on looking at, for example, how the federal government can most effectively respond to the threat of the H1N1 virus. So I'm very grateful to them.

We've got some other special guests here I just want to acknowledge very briefly. First of all, my great friend and a champion of science and technology here in the great Commonwealth of Massachusetts, my friend Deval Patrick is here. (Applause.) Our Lieutenant Governor Tim Murray is here. (Applause.) Attorney General Martha Coakley is here. (Applause.) Auditor of the Commonwealth, Joe DeNucci is here. (Applause.) The Mayor of the great City of Cambridge, Denise Simmons is in the house. (Applause.) The Mayor of Boston, Tom Menino, is not here, but he met me at the airport and he is doing great; he sends best wishes.

Somebody who really has been an all-star in Capitol Hill over the last 20 years, but certainly over the last year, on a whole range of issues -- everything from Afghanistan to clean energy -- a great friend, John Kerry. Please give John Kerry a round of applause. (Applause.)

And a wonderful member of Congress -- I believe this is your district, is that correct, Mike? Mike Capuano. Please give Mike a big round of applause. (Applause.)

Now, Dr. Moniz is also the Director of MIT's Energy Initiative, called MITEI. And he and President Hockfield just showed me some of the extraordinary energy research being conducted at this institute: windows that generate electricity by directing light to solar cells; light-weight, high-power batteries that aren't built, but are grown -- that was neat stuff; engineering viruses to create -- to create batteries; more efficient lighting systems that rely on nanotechnology; innovative engineering that will make it possible for offshore wind power plants to deliver electricity even when the air is still.

And it's a reminder that all of you are heirs to a legacy of innovation -- not just here but across America -- that has improved our health and our wellbeing and helped us achieve unparalleled prosperity. I was telling John and Deval on the ride over here, you just get excited being here and seeing these extraordinary young people and the extraordinary leadership of Professor Hockfield because it taps into something essential about America -- it's the legacy of daring men and women who put their talents and their efforts into the pursuit of discovery. And it's the legacy of a nation that supported those intrepid few willing to take risks on an idea that might fail -- but might also change the world.