Preview: Out Of Body

November 11, 8 p.m., November 12, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.

New College Theater (Farkas Hall)

Directed by Hazel A. Lever ’13

Produced by Andrea I. Moreno ‘12 and Talia M. Fox ’13

The Harvard Ballet Company (HBC) offers a fresh take on ballet in its upcoming performance “Out of Body.” This student-run production contrasts minimal costume and set design with an abundance of varied styles that range from classical ballet to contemporary pointe to modern. The show, featuring eleven routines, aspires to present dance in its many forms through its numerous pieces, mirroring the diversity found both in the Harvard dance community and the dance world as a whole.

The majority of the show’s choreography is crafted by the dancers themselves. Although it also uses some professional choreography to create an eclectic mix of dance styles set to an equally diverse soundtrack. The dancers perform to jazz, swing, and classical music, and even to Itzhak Perlman’s score from the film “Schindler’s List.” Three routines feature guest choreography by Victor Plotnikov, the principal dancer for the Boston Ballet and choreographer for Providence Ballet; Darcy Naganuma, professional modern choreographer of Naganuma Dance; and HBC alumna Nina Stoller-Lindsey ’10, who has choreographed pieces for LaGuardia High School for the Performing Arts.

“Seeing the whole show come together is really rewarding,” says producer Talia M. Fox ’13. The show prides itself on drawing from a wide array of inspirations, especially from the HBC members who have created the dance routines. According to producer Andrea I. Moreno ’12, “dancers come from very diverse backgrounds, so everyone brings their own personality into the routines.”

The show also hopes to stray from the traditional classical framework with which the audience usually associates ballet. “People come to our show expecting classical ballet, and they get some classical ballet, but we have something for everyone,” says Fox. “Out of Body” aims to create a meaningful amalgamation that first and foremost can be accessible to a wide audience. As director Hazel A. Lever ’13 notes, “we’re very aware of our audience, and that’s kind of the fun part of the show.” The performance is both surprising and unique, “because it’s so diverse, [and] you get to kind of pull the whole show around the different performances.”

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