Singles Roundup

New music from Lil Wayne, Lonely Island, and The Strokes

“Bitches Love Me (ft. Drake and Future)”

Lil Wayne, "I Am Not A Human Being II"

“I’m on that good kush and alcohol / I got some down bitches I can call,” murmurs Future at the opening of Lil Wayne’s newest single, “Bitches Love Me.” The song—with its abundant profanity and references to weed, booze, and, of course, bitches—will, when played on the radio, have almost as many words edited out as left intact. As such, it stands a fair chance of being 2013’s “Young, Wild & Free,” a similarly irreverent hit. And yet, it is Future and Drake’s infectious and profane chorus that carries the song, while Lil’ Wayne’s two verses fall flat. His lyrics meander aimlessly, and his rhymes lack creativity, moving from “Now kiss my ass if you hating” to “I’m getting ass while I’m skating.” With this track, Wayne truly seems to be riding on the popularity of his protege Drake, whose fame and talent have eclipsed Weezy’s own.

“YOLO (ft. Adam Levine and Kendrick Lamar)”

The Lonely Island

Although the concept of YOLO has been incessantly mocked since its arrival on the pop culture scene, The Lonely Island manages to revive the humor of a stale joke with off-kilter and overly cautious advice on how listeners may prolong their lives. Among other recommendations, the boys counsel their audience to “stay the hell away from drugs / Cause they’re not legal / Then bury all your money in the backyard / Like a beagle.” However, while Levine’s soaring chorus makes the song eminently more catchy, Lamar’s verse, filled with awkward financial advice, clashes with the song’s comedy. With its quirky lyrics and pop artist cameos, “YOLO” follows the group’s standard format but doesn’t push the limits of comedy as far as some of the trio’s previous songs. Rather, the group seems to be following its own advice: you only live once, so why take any chances?

“One Way Trigger”

The Strokes, “Comedown Machine”

The Strokes recently released the first single from their eagerly awaited upcoming album, and this first taste of “Comedown Machine” does not disappoint. “One Way Trigger” begins with a staccato synthpop beat and a falsetto mumble uncharacteristic of frontman Julian Casablancas. As the guitar kicks in, Casablancas’s voice drops to his standard coarse murmur but continues to oscillate between the two registers for the remainder of the song. The highly danceable track is perhaps more reminiscent of Casablancas’s 2009 solo album “Phrazes for the Young” than a typical Strokes album, but the guitar solo in the middle harkS back to The Strokes at their best. “One Way Trigger” promises exciting new work from The Strokes.

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