Last Minute Blocking Tips

Beth Drucker

Upperclassmen from each house crowd Annenberg Dining Hall yesterday to welcome members of the class of 2013 into their respective houses.

With blocking form submissions just around the corner, the next week will be a very stressful time for many freshmen. In order to try and help combat the unavoidable blocking anxiety, here are a few dos and don'ts that every freshman should follow.

Do: Rank your potential blockmate on a numerical scale from one to ten. Make sure to take into account a variety of components that factor into their overall value as a person. Some factors to consider are their personality, their sleep schedule, their physical appearance, and whether or not blocking with them will increase your street cred. It is also advisable to post these rankings in a public place—such as your entryway's bulletin board or your Facebook status—just to ensure everyone is on the same page.

Don't: Be accepting of your possible blockmates' weird living habits. These "quirks" such as skyping their dog and speaking to it in a Mickey Mouse voice or having a public appreciation for the band Nickelback may seem tolerable or even charming. But when the sounds of these pastimes transform into the haunting and torturous soundtrack that you fall asleep to at night, you will think differently.

Do: Present your possible blockmates with a series of tasks and critically assess their performance. Ask them to prepare you a meal, give you a back massage, or tell you a joke. Ask them what tricks they can do. The importance of knowing what each blockmate really brings to the table is paramount—you don't want to be surrounded by mediocre comics, subpar chefs, and people who can't properly execute a standard cartwheel for the next three years.

Don't: Foster hope that people will change. This concept is a lie that has been told to freshmen for eons in order to pacify them into submission. The flawed creatures you see before you are as good as they will ever be. Lying to yourself will do you no favors and probably result in a slow and painful realization process in the (possibly very near) future.

Do: Seriously consider floating. If it feels like your only hope, it probably is.

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