Sound Off: Murphy Explains Penn Loss

Published by Kate Leist on November 16, 2010 at 3:11AM

In the modern era of sports, being a college coach carries with it the burden of constant media attention. Facing dozens of reporters at press conferences, head coaches have gotten savvier—they say what they need to and leave the rest up for speculation. Here at The Back Page, we’re happy to decode some of these media sessions, showing the average fan what we think coaches’ answers “really” mean.

Harvard coach Tim Murphy was in an unenviable position on Saturday afternoon. In his team’s biggest game of the season, the Crimson simply got outplayed. Penn won at least a share of an Ivy title on Franklin Field, and Murphy knew his team was out of the running for its sixth crown under his leadership. He took an accordingly somber tone at the postgame press conference, giving due credit to Penn and accepting responsibility for the Crimson’s shortcomings. We take a look at what Murphy’s comments say about Harvard heading into the Yale game this weekend in this week’s edition of Sound Off.

(Continued)

The Full-Court Press: Katharine Chute '11

Published by Alex Sopko on November 16, 2010 at 3:11AM

Harvard senior Katharine Chute playing against Yale on Oct. 29.

Last Saturday, the Princeton women’s hockey had home-court advantage and a goalie who made 30 saves. Harvard had senior Katharine Chute. The Minnesota native, named “Ms. Hockey” in high school, scored both goals for the Crimson in a 2-2 tie. Playing in her final year for Harvard, Chute hopes that this is only the beginning of a great season for her and her team. In this exclusive interview, Chute looks back on her time in crimson, from embarrassing moments to dancing parents to touchy subjects. Every week, the Full-Court Press gives you the sort of personal scoop that you’re not likely to hear at a typical press conference.

Name: Katharine Chute

Year: 2011

Stats: A two-time ECAC Hockey All-Academic team pick, Chute finished her freshman year with a +15 ranking, scoring the game-winning goal against Clarkson in the ECAC semifinals. Chute was also prolific the two previous seasons, playing in all 65 matchups and scoring five goals each year.

Question time!

(Continued)

Analyzing the Start of the Men's Ivy League Basketball Season

Published by Timothy J. Walsh on November 16, 2010 at 3:11AM

The season is only five days old, but men’s Ivy League basketball is already 12 games deep. Sitting at a collective 5-7, the Ancient Eight has seen mixed results (to be expected in non-conference play), but it’s never too early to name some winners and losers for the opening days of play.

WINNERS

Preseason favorite Princeton could not have started its season off on a better note last Friday, as it topped Rutgers in overtime, 78-73. Admittedly, the Scarlet Knights are expected to be a weak team this year, but any BCS win is big. The Tigers got a huge lift from senior guard Dan Mavraides who scored a career-high 26 points, including six three-pointers. As expected, Princeton fell to the reigning national champions, No. 1 Duke, on Sunday, 97-60. The Tigers did not have a realistic shot at competing but at least garnered some exposure on ESPNU.

(Continued)

Canada Gets Retribution in Four Nations Cup

Published by Kate Leist on November 15, 2010 at 3:11AM
Josephine and the Technicolor Dreamcoat

Sophomore Josephine Pucci joined Crimson coach Katey Stone as a member of the U.S. national team that traveled to the Four Nations Cup in Canada last week.

The U.S. women’s national hockey team started off its stay at the Four Nations Cup with a shootout win over Canada, and the rematch between the two squads proved just as exciting. But this time, it was the host Canadians who came out on top, topping the American women, 3-2, in overtime on Saturday night in Newfoundland.

The U.S. team is coached by Harvard’s Katey Stone and featured three Crimson skaters—Julie Chu ’06-’07, Caitlin Cahow ’07-’08, and sophomore Josephine Pucci.

But the Canadian who proved to be the difference-maker was an all-too-familiar face for Harvard. Rebecca Johnston, a Canadian Olympic veteran who is also a junior at Cornell, scored both the first and game-winning goals for her team on Saturday.

(Continued)

The Game is Coming! But Big-Time Tailgates Aren't

Published by Madeleine Smith on November 15, 2010 at 3:11AM

The countdown to The Game can officially begin. In just six days, the Crimson football team will take to the field at Harvard Stadium to play Yale in the last game of the season.

Although yesterday’s loss puts the Crimson out of the running for the Ivy League Championship, the game, fueled by hundreds of years of rivalry, is still sure to be exciting.

And while we hope we can say the same for the tailgate, it seems like the Harvard administration is doing anything it can to stifle the student tradition that necessarily accompanies any big collegiate football matchup.

(Continued)