The New 52

The New 52: The Flash #1

November 03, 2011

In the world of comic books, it does not take much to become a super hero. Average kid turned avenger after the death of his parents, zero becomes hero with the bite of a radioactive spider—all that is required seems to be a dose of tragedy and a pinch of being at the wrong place at the wrong time.

For Barry Allen, becoming the fastest man alive was just as easy. All it takes is an electrifying shock of lighting combined with a healthy dousing of chemicals. The next thing the guy knows, he is periodically skipping his day job as Central City Police Department’s scientist so that he can disguise himself as the Flash, spending a couple of blinks of the eye fighting crime and kicking ass.

Read more

The New 52: Aquaman #1

November 03, 2011

Strange Xenomorph/Predator-like creatures have finally discovered that there is an “above” to the Atlantic Ocean. They are coming for us, and their razor-sharp teeth and phosphorescent claws are fearsome-looking. Another thing—they clearly view humans as a food source. But don’t worry! Aquaman is (hopefully) here to save us! And thus opens the newly released “Aquaman” #1. DC Comics has recently released “The New 52,” an attempt to relaunch their superheroes to a new demographic, for all those who haven’t been keeping up with the previously impenetrable comic book market. Try to open a Batman comic—your viewing of “The Dark Knight” would not be able to help you decipher what the heck is going on in Gotham.

It’s nice to be able to have a fresh beginning for all of the superheroes, and Aquaman, the usually forgotten and mostly unknown merman/king of Atlantis may finally get the recognition he deserves, except when James Cameron made a pre-"Avatar" billion-dollar film version of the hero on "Entourage."

Read more

The New 52: Action Comics #1

September 24, 2011

[Editor's note: DC Comics' "The New 52" initiative aims to bring a new audience into the DC Universe by rebooting or significantly changing all of their superheroes and restarting them back at issue #1. In this series, the comic book newbies of The Crimson attempt to evaluate the quality and accessibility of The New 52.   —Brian Feldman, Arts Web Editor]

DC Comics holds a role so powerfully prominent in American culture that many of its characters have become household names. Yet its masterful stories have become extremely convoluted, so much so that new readers wishing to learn the backgrounds of their favorite superheroes found it difficult to catch up without starting from the very beginning of the entire series. All of this has led up to the release of the new Action Comics #1. Can DC bring in new readers with America’s greatest icon, Superman?

Read more

The New 52: Detective Comics #1

September 23, 2011

[Editor's note: DC Comics' "The New 52" initiative aims to bring a new audience into the DC Universe by rebooting or significantly changing all of their superheroes and restarting them back at issue #1. In this series, the comic book newbies of The Crimson attempt to evaluate the quality and accessibility of The New 52.   —Brian Feldman, Arts Web Editor]

The first issue of “Detective Comics” I ever read was published 27 years before I was born (Issue #345 The Blockbuster Invasion of Gotham City). I like comic books that start and end in a single issue. I like solid artwork where the superheroes are larger than life but not steroid junkies or Picasso melt-aways. But reading DC’s new “Detective Comics” #1 was quite the new experience. The journey begins with some introspection about the Joker, and then quickly transitions to a lengthy action sequence.

Read more

The New 52: Justice League #1

September 10, 2011

[Editor's note: DC Comics' "The New 52" initiative aims to bring a new audience into the DC Universe by rebooting or significantly changing all of their superheroes and restarting them back at issue #1. In this series, the comic book newbies of The Crimson attempt to evaluate the quality and accessibility of The New 52.   —Brian Feldman, Arts Web Editor]

The new Justice League #1 is a little hard to follow initially, as it places more focus on the visual than dialogue and contains no narration. It's like watching still frames from a film, so for a newbie like myself, it takes some concentration. Almost the entire issue is dialogue that provides little exposition, and so it is as if the characters are as in the dark as the audience is. The banter is typical 21st century. That is to say sarcastic and casual. The Green Lantern, upon meeting Batman for the first time, exclaims in disbelief and disappointment: "You're not just some guy in a bat costume, are you? Are you freaking kidding me?!" Gone are the days of sound effects like  "Bam!" and "Pow!" which used to show strength and a certain level of badass-ness. Now the sound effects are "KRRRRKKKK" and "Krash" with a "K". Because ‘crash’ with a ‘c’ is less cool than ‘Krash’ with a ‘k’.

Read more

Data Sculpture
Visual Arts

Painting by the Numbers: Data Visualization

School at School
Columns

What We Forget About School: School

Head of the Charles
Men's Crew

Head of the Charles 2014

Understanding Faith
Columns

Understanding Faith