Biology

Louis Agassiz
Harvard in the World

Retrospection: Agassiz's Expeditions in Brazil

But for Agassiz, the trip to Brazil was about more than science. Not only was evolution—a process not immediately observable to the human eye—deeply antithetical to Agassiz’s staunch empiricism, evolution was profoundly at odds with his perceived world order.

A Wine and Microbe Affair
College

A Wine and Microbe Affair

Harvard affiliates and Cambridge locals watch as microbiology and immunobiology professor Roberto Kolter introduces “Appreciating Wine and the Microbes that Make It”, an outreach event by Harvard’s Microbial Sciences Initiative. Attendees listened to a lecture about the chemical processes involved in winemaking and had the opportunity to taste wine samples at the end of the program.

Health

Harvard Researchers Link Neurotransmitter to Autism

Harvard researchers recently linked a symptom of autism with the malfunction of GABA signaling pathways, discovering the first proven connection between autism and a specific neurotransmitter in humans.

College

Professors Discuss Rage at Interdisciplinary Symposium

Harvard professors from four different departments discussed the phenomenon of rage in human behavior.

Beaker Time
College

Beaker Time

Mahan Nekoui ’17, left, and Gal Wachtel ’17, right, work on an experiment in a Molecular and Cellular Biology 60 lab on Tuesday. Students designed their own experiments to examine protein interactions in damaged cells.

Beaker Time
College

Beaker Time

Courtney C. Okwara ’18, left, and Dar C. Nwaudo ’18, right, work on an experiment in a Molecular and Cellular Biology 60 lab on Tuesday. Their experiment tests the effects of DNA damage on the function of yeast cells.

Beaker Time
College

Beaker Time

Mahan Nekoui ’17, left, and Gal Wachtel ’17, right, work on an experiment in a Molecular and Cellular Biology 60 lab on Tuesday, Nov. 3. Students designed their own experiments to examine protein interactions in damaged cells.

Radcliffe DNA Symposium
Radcliffe Institute

Radcliffe DNA Symposium

Principal Investigator Terence D. Capellini and visiting graduate student Jiaxue Cao present their poster at Radcliffe’s DNA symposium on Friday afternoon. The conference, called “The Past, Present, and Future of DNA,” featured lectures about human ancestry, forensics, and ethics.

Integrated Science
Student Life

Integrated Science

Approximately 25 students attend the second lecture of Life Science 50a, the first half of an intensive two-semester, double course incorporating topics in biology, chemistry, math, computing, and physics.

Andrew W. Murray
Student Life

Andrew W. Murray

Molecular Genetics professor Andrew W. Murray, course head of Life Science 50a, demonstrates examples of rule-based symbol transformation during the course’s second lecture.

Integrated Science
College

New Intensive Integrated Life Sciences Course Launches

The course will serve as the academic equivalent of four individual courses and incorporates biology, chemistry, math, computing, and physics into a life sciences curriculum.

Understanding Islands
Museums

Understanding Islands

Jonathan B. Losos ’84, professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, explains the ecological significance of islands and their role in understanding evolution. The talk took place in a packed Geological Lecture Hall and was part of the Cambridge Science Festival, happening from April 17-26.

Troubled Frogs
Harvard Law School

Troubled Frogs

Tyrone Hayes ’89 speaks about his research on atrazine, a drug denied regulatory approval in the EU due to its demonstrated endocrine disruption in frogs, which subsequently ensued in controversy. Hayes gave the lecture entitled "From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads and Men" at Harvard Law School on Thursday evening.

College

Mummies and Microbes: A Conversation with Ralph Mitchell

Mitchell’s pure passion for applied microbiology is obvious from the start of our conversation—he seems to be on a mission to convince me of how important these microscopic organisms are.

On Genetics and Population Bottlenecks
College

Lecturer Examines Evolution 70,000 Years After Volcanic Eruption

Stanley H. Ambrose, a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, lectured on the behavioral differences between modern humans and Neanderthals, and the implication of those differences in the context of environmental degradation more than 70,000 years ago.