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When Religion Pollutes
On Campus

When Religion Pollutes

Boston University School of Law Professor Jay D. Wexler presents his talk "When Religion Pollutes" at the 2015 Annual Law, Religion and Health in America Conference Saturday. With case studies of ritualistic mercury use among New York City Santeria practitioners and conservative Amish sects refusing to obey waste treatment regulations, Wexler drew a clear picture of how the law often creates conflict between health and religion in the United States.

The Intersection of Law, Religion, and Infectious Disease
On Campus

The Intersection of Law, Religion, and Infectious Disease

Florida International University Professor Aileen M. Marty ends her Law, Religion and Health in America Conference talk with a humorous cartoon depicting a cremated person's attempt at entering Heaven. Her presentation Saturday described the challenges of developing human remains disposal policies in cases of infectious disease and was one of many to highlight the importance of respect for different belief systems at the conference.

After Hobby Lobby
On Campus

After Hobby Lobby

A panel consisting of E. J. Dionne Jr., Divinity School lecturer Diane L. Moore, Law School professor Charles Fried, and Frank Wolf discussed the role of religion in the American public sphere at the Law School Thursday. The pre-conference session was co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center and the Ambassador John L. Loeb, Jr. Initiative on Religious Freedom and Its Implications at the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University.

After Hobby Lobby
On Campus

Photos of the Day (05/08/2015)

After Hobby Lobby
Religion

Panel Objects to Hobby Lobby Ruling

Some of the panelists raised objections to the Supreme Court ruling that corporations can exercise the same religious rights as individuals.

Marching to Remember
College

Marching to Remember

Students march for Yom Hashoah, an annual remembrance of Jewish victims of the Holocaust. The march, which happened Thursday afternoon, was organized by Aaron Y. Grand ’18, the Jewish Life Chair of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity at Harvard College and was advertised primarily to students affiliated with the fraternity or Harvard Hillel.

Harvard-Yale Field
College

God of the Playing Field

For many of Harvard's athletes of faith, religion is a strong component of their identity both on and off the field. However, balancing that identity with the demands of a varsity sport is anything but easy.

Working Hard
College

Photos of the Day (04/16/2015)

Divest Harvard: Faith Day
Central Administration

Divest Harvard: Faith Day

Protesters attend a "Faith Day" rally in front of Massachusetts Hall. The event was held on Wednesday morning as part of "Harvard Heat Week."

Harvard Holi 2015
Student Groups

Harvard Holi 2015

Easter Mass
Religion

Easter Mass

People fill St. Paul Catholic Church for Mass on Easter Sunday.

Passover Seder
College

Passover Seder

Alpha Epsilon Pi brother Edgar J. Orozco ’16 smiles as he dips his finger in wine during a Passover seder in Hillel on Saturday evening. Over the weekend several student groups hosted seders, a traditional Jewish ritual to celebrate Passover.

AEPI Passover Seder
College

AEPI Passover Seder

From right, Alpha Epsilon Pi brothers Aaron E. Pelz ’16, Crimson editor Gregory A. Briker ’17, Ethan S. H. Fried ’16, and Jacob S. Goldberg ’16 celebrate Passover during a seder, a traditional Jewish ritual, in Hillel on Saturday evening.

H.E.M. Issoufou Mahamadou
On Campus

Photos of the Weekend (04/05/2015)

Religion

Taking Pause: Shabbat at Harvard

The fourth of the Ten Commandments tells its followers they should no do any work on the Sabbath day. “Work,” here, doesn’t just refer to your 9-to-5, but is rather understood to mean any act creates or exercises control over one’s surroundings. This places a number of restrictions upon the observer, which range from not using electricity to not writing, and even to not tying knots.

Administrators on the Stage
College

Class of 2019: Academics & Extracurriculars

The View of Convocation
College

Class of 2019: By the Numbers

Sorry, Dorothy
Highlight

Sorry, Dorothy

Skipping Stones
Highlight

Skipping Stones