Contributing writer

Sabrina G. Yates

Latest Content

Theater

From Broadway to Boston, ‘The Beauty Queen of Leenane’ Thrills Audiences

As with any stereotypical small, quaint town, Leenane holds countless secrets. The inner workings of the characters’ hearts and minds stay secret for years, but, over the course of the play, slowly reveal themselves.

On Campus

Daniel S. Kramer Reinvents ‘A Dream Play’ in Farkas Hall

Creating a professional-quality show—the second in the TDM Department’s history—while simultaneously mentoring Harvard students provided Kramer with a unique opportunity outside of the limits of commercial theater. “It was a great opportunity to explore one of the greatest pieces of avant-garde theater ever written,” he says.

"Fertile Solitude" at the Boston Center for the Arts
Visual Arts

‘Fertile Solitude’ Flourishes at the Boston Center for the Arts

“Fertile Solitude” at the Boston Center for the Arts creates an immersive experience complete with art that appeals to every sense. The visitor's experience can encompass everything from smelling rain and cigarette ashes to touching withered 1950s magazines. These varied interpretations of solitude seek to redefine what it means to be alone.

On Campus

"40" Never Looked So Good

The Harvard Radcliffe Modern Dance Company’s new show “40,” proves that at their middle age, the dance troupe is as graceful as it’s ever been and promises many more decades of inspired modern dance.

Upstream
Books

'Upstream' Both Boring and Brilliant

The five sections each have their own personality and purpose but work together to accomplish the book’s goal of reviving humanity’s love of nature while concurrently elucidating Oliver’s identity as a writer.

No Tomorrow
Arts

‘No Tomorrow’ Mixes Up the Romcom Status Quo

The pilot of “No Tomorrow” hovers in the gray area between a flop and a success. While it lacks some critical elements, such as good characterization, its twists of novelty show potential.

On Campus

ART’s ‘Plough’ Lands Among the Stars

Although a true sense of sincerity among the actors did not emerge until later in the play, the creative staff revived and reinvented “The Plough and the Stars,” which ran from Sept. 24 to Oct. 9, as a relevant show.