News

Annual Report Finds Harvard Kennedy School Faculty Remains Largely White, Male

News

Harvard Square Celebrates Oktoberfest

News

Harvard Corporation Members Donated Big to Democrats in 2020 Elections

News

City Council Candidates Propose Strategies for Supporting Low-Income Residents at Virtual Forum

News

FAS Dean Gay Hopes to Update Affiliates on Ethnic Studies Search by Semester’s End

LETTER FROM CORNELL.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

LITTLE has as yet been done in boating; the crew have not been selected, and have not, therefore, practised together. The work of selecting the crew will begin immediately, and in the next letter it may be announced decisively who the men are. King, the stroke of last year, will undoubtedly continue with the crew this year. But the energies of the students have not been slumbering in regard to athletic sports; they have merely been diverted, and, crowned with success, they now return to boating with renewed interest. About four months ago, one of our professors, William E. Byerly, a graduate of Harvard, a gentleman who has always manifested great interest in physical culture, determined to make the Gymnasium, which had so often been planned, a tangible reality; he interested several of the students with him in the affair, an association was formed, subscription papers sent out, Mr. Cornell gave a beautiful site overlooking the lake and surrounding country for many miles, and after determined and systematic work the undertaking may now be called, we are glad to say, an entire success. Thirteen hundred dollars have been subscribed, six hundred more is required for apparatus, and without doubt will soon be furnished by the students. The building, which is now in process of erection, will be of wood, about fifty-five by twenty-five feet; the plans and specifications have been furnished by Professor Babcock, Professor of Architecture, whose name is a sufficient guaranty of their utility and beauty.

The feeling among the students in regard to the place where the next regatta should be held is strongly in favor of Saratoga. Springfield and New London are out of the question, and the dispute now is between Saratoga and Troy. It seems likely at present that the delegates will be instructed to vote in favor of Saratoga. There is a bitter feeling in the minds of many against the men who had the regatta in charge last year at Springfield; as immediately after the race, Cornell's position in the race was telegraphed over the country as eleventh, when it was perfectly evident to every man on the grand stand that her position was fourth. It is thought by some that a Freshman crew will be sent on, together with the University crew; but it is not at all probable.

Coeducation is not regarded with much favor by the students at large; and although there are at present here about thirty girls, yet it would be unjust to pronounce judgment upon the scheme as yet, since no special arrangements have been made for them; nor will there be until the completion of the Sage College, which will probably be opened formally next academic year. The girls who are here at present study hard, but in many cases do not keep up with their classes; and as a rule they are not ordinary girls by any means. Dr. Clarke's Sex in Education has been widely read, and the majority of the students hold substantially the same opinions as those expressed by the Doctor in the chapter on Coeducation.

The opportunity must not be lost to thank the Harvard crew for their uniform kindliness and courtesy toward our crew at Springfield last year, and to express the hope that the most cordial relations may always exist between the undergraduates of Harvard and Cornell.

JAY EFFGEE.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags