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TUFTS vs. HARVARD.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Our men were fortunate enough to gain the toss, and the first half-hour was hotly contested, Harvard keeping the ball down by the Tufts goal, except when interrupted by the brilliant rushes of Harrington and Dwinell. The first half-hour was finished without a touch-down on either side.

The second half-hour Tufts had the wind, but our men seemed to have warmed up to their work, Cushing very nearly making a touch-down and the ball still sticking close to the Tufts line. The heavy weight of the Tufts men seemed to make them less able to stand the tumbling, and their wind seemed to be giving out, for they were evidently playing for time, their repeated and unnecessary cries of "foul" becoming rather laughable. The second half-hour closed without a touch-down, but leaving our men full of confidence, though rather disgusted at the "foul" crying and the friendly "hints" with which the Tufts umpire encouraged his men. The third half-hour was closely contested, and the crowd were on tiptoe with excitement. The elevens seemed to gain strength from the enthusiasm of their friends, both sides fighting like tigers. The ball was run up and down from one goal to another, Wetherbee of the Harvards making two beautiful runs. Harrington of Tufts kept up his well-earned reputation until he was disabled, and although he pluckily kept to his work, Tufts felt his loss and the ball stuck closer to their side. Herrick with a beautiful run and drop-kick at the side of the field, thirty yards from the goal, sent the ball between the posts, and Faucon rushed in and secured the ball. The Harvard men rushed pell-mell into the field and chaired Herrick, though their enthusiasm was slightly cooled by the decision of the umpire that Herrick's kick was a "punt," not a "drop," and that, therefore, the goal did not count; Faucon's touch-down, however, did count. Seamans planted the ball beautifully between the posts, and the game was Harvard's. Further play was prevented by darkness. All the men did finely; Blanchard, Herrick, Cushing, Wetherbee, Seamans, and Hall being most worthy of praise.

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