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THE general report that the Lampoon has altogether ceased to be a college paper turns out to be quite false. It is true that several of the editors are no longer undergraduates. At the end of last year it appeared that there were so few men in college who were at once able and willing to join the staff of the Lampoon, that either the paper must be dropped, or the old editorial board must continue to manage it. The latter alternative was chosen, and the paper remains in the same hands in which it was last year. The popularity which the paper had attained during the last year led the editors to hope for a rather wider circulation than before; and by way of attracting public attention, they issued the circular which has given rise to so much misapprehension. The meaning of this was nothing more than that they hoped for encouragement from the friends of Harvard away from Cambridge; and that, while edited by Harvard men and looking at things from a Harvard point of view, the Lampoon did not intend to confine itself, any more than it had before, to matters immediately connected with undergraduate life. That their paper was to be considered as anything more than an amateur periodical, managed by men in college or still upon its borders, and chiefly supported by Harvard men, never entered their heads. It has turned out, however, that many undergraduates have hastily concluded that, because the Lampoon was endeavoring to attract attention outside of the college, it intended henceforth to neglect the college altogether; and the paper has consequently suffered from a certain degree of unpopularity. It is to be hoped that this will not persist, for the Lampoon is an effort unique in the history of American college journalism. It has been from the beginning an admirable exponent of the less serious side of Harvard life. It has kept up from the beginning the excellent standard with which it started, and it thoroughly deserves the support of all Harvard men.

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