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VENTILATION.

TO THE EDITORS OF THE CRIMSON : -

As might be expected, the several articles published in your paper last year on the subject of ventilation produced no effect. It is admitted, I believe, by nearly all architects, that they are unable to lay down rules in regard to the ventilation and acoustical properties of buildings. They say that in the present state of the building art these things are a mere matter of chance. This being the case, we cannot find fault with the constructors of our recitation-rooms, particularly as they were most of them built long before ventilation was ever heard of. What I do want to suggest is that the College can, at a small expense, relieve those who suffer from draughts and those who suffer from close air, by introducing an invention which was used in some of the schools of Boston a few years ago (and is still, for all that the writer knows to the contrary), consisting of a board which fits into the window-frame, and is furnished with a large pipe covered with a wire netting through which the draught of air is regulated by a damper. If a supply of these were put into University, the number of students kept in their rooms by colds would be very much diminished, and the powers that be would be relieved of the trouble of reading numerous physicians' certificates.

C.

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