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CORRESPONDENCE.

BOOKS NOT LENT AT THE LIBRARY.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

TO THE EDITORS OF THE CRIMSON:-

THERE is an old abuse existing at the Library which needs Mr. Winsor's immediate attention; certain books are not allowed to be taken from the shelves. Occasionally, one's card is returned with an ominous-looking blue star marked on it, which means that the book will not be given out. The Librarian, in his Report, favors increasing the access of the students to the books; the abolition of this silly restriction on our privileges should be one of the first steps in that direction. There is no good reason for refusing a student the use of a book, except its extreme value or rarity; to withhold books because there is supposed to be something indelicate in them, - the ordinary reason, I presume, - is nothing but silly prudery. Any student who wishes to take a book out on account of its improper character will certainly not be injured in his morals by reading it; and those who call for these books, as most students do, because they really want them are often put to some trouble and expense to obtain the books elsewhere than at the Library. We cannot conceive how any sensible person could object to a student's using some of the books that are now "caged" in the Library. When such books as the much-quoted "Decameron" and Swinburne's beautiful poems are withdrawn from circulation, it is time to protest.

'80.

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