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AN item in the Echo a few days since announced the establishment at Columbia of a six-year honor course in modern languages. Scandinavian, unknown at Harvard, is included in the list; and, as far as we can judge without fuller information, the course seems to us a very complete and judicious one. That some change must soon be made in our own method is evident, and the example of Columbia may well be cited as a move in the right direction. A course covering six years will certainly be an inducement to those interested in the study of modern languages; and if Harvard takes no forward step in the matter, it is easy to see what the relative position of the two colleges will be, in this one branch at least, a dozen years hence. The study of modern languages, Teutonic and Romance, is surely, if slowly, taking the place of Greek and Latin in the scheme of liberal culture. Harvard will show foresight in not allowing herself to be surpassed by Columbia, the college which, from liberality of spirit and earnestness of purpose, must be regarded as her most formidable as well as most generous rival.

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