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THEATRICAL ATTRACTIONS NEXT WEEK.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

At the Globe Theatre next Monday evening "Patience" will be presented in a spectacular form, and on a much larger scale than has yet been attempted in this city. The company is a new one which has recently been formed by Mr. John Stetson. Miss Hattie Moore, late from San Francisco, will take the part of Patience, and Madame Jarbeau that of Angela. Miss Moore is spoken of by the San Francisco papers as a charming actress.

At the Boston Theatre, Den Thompson will continue with his quaint old play, "Josh Whitcomb," and the large audiences that greet him, will probably laugh as heartily at his absurdities next week, as they always have in the past.

At the Park, Miss Maggie Mitchell will present a new play by Mr. George F. Fuller, called "The Little Savage." The play is highly spoken of and is well worthy of being added to the fine repertoire of this charming little actress.

Mr. Boucicault will continue his long run at the Museum with "Arrah-na-Pogue." This is one of the most effective of Boucicault's dramas of Irish life, and has been greeted with crowded houses every night this week.

At the Gaiety, Lecoq's opera bouffe, Girofle Girofla will be produced by a special company.

At the Windsor, Frank I. Frayne in "Si Slocum."

At the Howard, Langdon and Allison's "Swift and Sure" Combination.

The production of the Greek play at the Globe this week has proved that Boston's claim for a love of the classical, and an adoration of the beautiful, is a decided sham. The beautiful setting of this play, which has never been surpassed in magnitude in Boston, has failed to draw as large an audience as the smallest that ever greeted such a play as the "Black Crook." And this is aesthetic Boston!

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