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We publish to-day a communication from an officer of the Athletic Association, which takes us to task for the editorial that appeared in our columns yesterday, criticising the lack of energy shown by men in track athletics. The writer is apparently laboring under the impression that the criticism was directed against the officers of the H. A. A. If he had read the editorial more carefully, he would see that this was not the case; but on the contrary, that it was directed against men in college who have ability they will not develop. If the editorial in question was not clear enough in this point, the spirit of the editorial of Saturday's issue was unmistakeable. We quote a few lines: "As a whole the meetings this year have not been up to the standard of former years; not, we think, because of any negligence on the part of the students of the Athletic Association, but rather because of the lack of interest of men in college. The efforts made by the Athletic Association to arouse interest in the weekly contests they arranged, met with feeble responce and were abandoned. It is this lack of interest that has made the meetings this year inferior to those of former years." The editorial of yesterday was written in the same spirit as the one from which we have quoted and contains not the slightest criticism of the management of the H. A. A. No one realizes more fully than we the hard conscientious work that the management of the Athletic Association has done through the winter and spring, and we gladly recognize it now, as we have often done before. It is the lack of enthusiasm among the men which we condemned yesterday and which we will continue to condemn as long as we have hope that our words will have effect.

The writer of the communication has accused us of careless about investigation and eagerness to condemn. We trust he will see that his words turn back upon himself. The CRIMSON does not criticise for the sake of criticising, but because it hopes to eradicate evil and bring about good. If men would take its editorials in the spirit in which they are written, and above all, would be less hot-headed in jumping to unwarranted conclusions, much ill feeling would be spared.

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