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The question what are we to have this winter, in the way of evening lectures and readings, is promptly answered, from one quarter at least, by the announcement made elsewhere by the Shakespeare Club. The prospectus of the club-if we may call it so, for the organization is not yet completed-embrace a course of lectures by gentlemen who are well known exponents of the art of speaking, readings by Mr. Jones, and recitations by the members of the club. The plan which the club has in giving these entertainments, to bring the subject of elocution before the college at large, is an excellent one. The study of elocution is one which is too much neglected here, and which languishes rather from the students' tendency to keep in the regular rut to which they are accustomed, than from any fault of the study itself. Those who do take up elocution generally become enthusiastic over it, but their number is too small to make an impression upon the great mass of the indifferent. The plan proposed by the founders of the Shakespeare Club is a step in the right direction, and the new organization if it adopts it, will deserve credit for the vigor with which it will begin its existence. Lectures from two such entertaining speakers as Beecher and Irving will do much to excite a general interest both in the club and in Elocution.

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