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MR. MUYBRIDGE'S LECTURE.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Boylston Hall was crowded last night by the audience assembled to hear Mr. Muybridge lecture on "Animal Motion." Remarking that he usually made some preparation when intending to deliver an address, but that in this case before an audience so capable of criticism he would not presume to do so, Mr. Muybridge proceeded to take up the much disputed question of the different positions assumed by a horse in motion. By means of the instantaneous system of photography the lecturer had obtained a series of views of a moving horse, which gave correctly every attitude, and which have settled conclusively many vexed questions. It was clearly shown that in walking a horse touches the ground with his left lateral hind foot, left lateral fore foot, right lateral hind foot and right lateral fore foot, in the order named. Two and sometimes three feet in the walk and amble are always on the ground. In the trot, rack, canter and run the horse in certain positions does not touch the ground at all. Especially is this case in a swift run when the horse is in the air more than half the time. With the stereoptican and Zoopraxiscohe the movements of horses walking, trotting cantering, jumping, etc., men walking, running, boxing, wrestling, turning somersaults, leaping, etc., as well as different movements of oxen, goats and dogs were clearly portrayed. A number of pictures of old models constructed by the ancients and intended to show animals in motion, when compared with the cuts taken by Mr. Muybridge served to show the erroneous impressions held by even the most observing of the ancient and in fact modern artists. It is the intention of Mr. Muybridge to accept the offer of the University of Pennsylvania to spend the summer in making investigations and so far perfecting his system of photography as to be able to show even the action of the muscles, thereby rendering the invention of more practical utility for the purposes of artists and sculptors. The Zoopraxiscohe is a machine invented by Mr. Muybridge, and which consists substantially of a round plate with small slits cut in it, inside of which and between which a powerful light revolves a metal hoop to which is attached inverted images of the animal which it is desired to represent in motion. The Zoopraxiscohe is novel in its ideas and unique in its arrangement, and its use last evening in every instance called forth hearty applause.

The lecture as well as the illustrations were very interesting throughout and Mr. Muybridge deserves the thanks of the college for the pleasure and profit he afforded us.

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