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BOOK NOTICES.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

"STUDENTS' SONGS. Compiled by W. H. Hills, '80. Moses King: Cambridge." It is to be regretted that the song-book committee which was organized last year was unable to bring out a judiciously edited and representative book of college songs. But, as many of the members of that committee, however, graduated with '82, and as the originators of the idea have this year been unable to spend the necessary time, the project has been abandoned. The matter was pressed less earnestly than it would otherwise have been on account of the announced intention of the publisher of "Students' Songs" to bring out a new and greatly improved edition of that work. The long expected volume has at last appeared. Although, as a collection of student songs, the book is by no means perfect, still, considering the remarkably low price at which it is sold, it should meet with a favorable reception on the part of all college students. Fifteen songs are introduced which were not included in the former editions - "Fair Harvard," "Yale Men Say," "Climbing, Climbing, Climbing," "Tally Ho," "The Midshipmite," "There is a Tavern in the Town," "Drink, Puppy, Drink," and several other songs which have become familiar to the college ear. The only criticism to be made on the book is a lack of thoroughness in arranging some of the newly inserted songs. "Fair Harvard," for example, should have been arranged in parts, as should the chorus of "Over the Garden Wall." Only the chorus of "Climbing" is given, although the introductory solo is the prettiest portion of the song; while the words of "Yale Men Say" are sadly mangled. All these imperfections might easily have been avoided by a little care. The typographical appearance of the book is all that could have been desired and is in marked contrast to many of the books of college songs which are in general use. The book will, no doubt, prove as popular as its predecessors.

MOSES KING'S "HANDBOOK OF PROVIDENCE" seems to contain everything that can be said about that city, and should be called an encyclopaedia rather than a handbook. It devotes about a page to Brown University. The book is well printed, on very heavy paper, too heavy, however for the purposes of the publication.

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