Advertisement

No Headline

It cannot be said that the action of the Princeton faculty in the present athletic movement as thus far reported is very encouraging so far as Harvard is concerned. As it stands at present Yale has totally withdrawn from the business, Princeton is very doubtful, and is reported as probably opposed to the resolutions. As it seems to stand at present Harvard is expected to ally herself with some few of the smaller and less important colleges alone in accepting the new regulations. We do not know what grounds of hope the Harvard authorities have for hoping that the case will be otherwise. We do not know either what substantial reasons Harvard has for hoping that her persistence in the new policy will ultimately coerce Yale and Princeton into adopting it. A hope that such an event will take place can but be founded on the blindest faith in the superiority of Harvard's position. This faith we cannot share in. We do not see any reason why it will be found impossible for Princeton, who expresses herself in favor of reasonable reforms and restrictions in athletics to adopt such reforms to suit her own needs and then arrive at a satisfactory convention with Yale and Brown by which inter-collegiate athletics can be continued at these colleges under reasonable restrictions, and all this without entering into the new agreement with Harvard and the rural colleges. In this event we see no outcome for Harvard but the total destruction of inter-collegiate sports. But this result would not perhaps be looked upon altogether as an evil by those in power. We cannot but think that the accession of Princeton, Brown and Columbia at least to the new scheme is necessary to its success at Harvard on any other basis than the total destruction of inter-collegiate sports with us.

Recommended Articles

Advertisement