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The CRIMSON now betakes itself to the discussion of - punch. That is to say, to the discussion of punch in its relations to "Bloody Monday Night." A communication from "An '88 Man," which will be found in another column, contains a strong appeal for the discontinuance of the customary freshman entertainments. The effort to do away with this annual celebration is by no means the outgrowth of any recent spirit of reform. Protests have been made before, and often, too, against the further continuance of the custom. Yet the fact remains that "Bloody Monday," though not the night of terror that it once was, is still a Cambridge institution. Whether or not it will die out entirely, or will still hold its place in the esteem of upper-classmen, remains to be seen.

As to the fact that freshmen have been led to keep open house by some agencies more potent than their own inclinations or the exercise of mere "moral suasion" on the part of their elders, we would remark that the days have departed when fear of any summary, vengence from the awful sophomores should have influence on the doings of any freshman.

The "Bloody Monday" of our day is, after all, a harmless affair enough, and but for a lamentable lack of self-control on the part of some of the participants in its rites, would hardly call for comment either condemnatory or otherwise.

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