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A recent number of the Evening Post has letters from Cornell, Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Yale and Harvard. The establishment of a new professorship in the "science and art of teaching" at Cornell, the adoption of the "group system" at Johns Hopkins, the scheme of making a university at Princeton, the election of a new president and the building of a gymnasium at Yale, and the increased interest in foot-ball, the Conference Committee and the literary improvements at Harvard are the principal subjects discussed in these letters.

Perhaps the most interesting, or at least the most significant, of these subjects are those from Cornell and Johns Hopkins. The establishment of a professorship in the "science and art of teaching" deserves notice. Because so many go into this profession, we may wonder that the colleges of the country have not given it more recognition. That there are "science and art" in teaching, and that teaching in these times is as much a profession to be carefully studied and learned, before it is practiced, as law or medicine, or the ministry, cannot be disputed. Cornell has taken a step that other colleges would do well to consider.

The adoption of the "group system" by Johns Hopkins, shows a leaning towards the elective system. It is, as it were, a compromise between the old system of prescribed studies and the elective system. Although the scheme, as published in another column, gives the students of Johns Hopkins more freedom than they have ever had before, yet it will not be surprising if this very taste of freedom does not encourage them to call for the freedom that only the thorough going elective system can give.

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