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Note and Comment.

The affair of Monday last is the most discouraging defeat Princeton athletics has sustained since the memorable first game with Yale of last year. It is all the more disheartening, because little or almost nothing, can be said in apology of it. As was the case in our first championship game, wretched base running and one or two costly errors lost us the game. The fault lay not so much with the coachers as with the base runners. True, the visitors' catcher was a hard man on whom to steal bases, but a number of our runners were very slow, and could not have handled them-selves much more awkwardly than they did, had they tried. The Harvard team, in direct contrast to our own, were adepts in the art, and ran bases like professionals.

Princeton's fielding was far below the standard of her previous games. The trouble is, there are a few men on the team who think their playing is unquestionable in the extreme. If these gentlemen labor under the misapprehension that base-ball is an innate accomplishment, and not the result of hard, steady work they are mistaken, and the sooner they rid their minds of this idea, the better it will be for their reputation in the eyes of the college, and Princeton's chances for the championship. However, we are still in the race, and our hope, though diminished, is by no means desperate. The lesson of last year is still fresh in minds, when a team, starting out under adverse prospects, captured the inter-collegiate pennant. Our team can play ball, and the experience of eighty-fives's nine assures us that any team of average ability can learn to run bases. - Princetonian.

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