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The History of Harvard's Commencement, Explained

Bibiographical Contributions by Harvard Professors for the Year 1887.

II.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Prof. Laughlin has written a book on "Elements of Political Economy." It is uniform with Appleton's text-books on Science. It is designed especially for the use of beginners in political economy, and parts of it apply to questions of the day on finance and kindred topics. Professor James has edited J. E. Mande's "The Foundations of Ethics." Mr. Justin Winsor has written the fifth volume of his "Narrative and Critical History of America," a volume of 649 pages, besides doing a vast amount of compiling in connection with his official duties as librarian of the University. Professor Child has written Part IV. of the "English and Scottish Popular Ballads." Professor Charles Eliot Norton has edited, for the Macmillans of London, the "Reminiscences of Thomas Carlyle" and "The Correspondence of Gaethe and Carlyle." In the realms of fiction little has been done; but the two works published have been conceeded by all reviewers as unqualifiedly successful. "Rankell's Remains," by Mr. Barrett Wendell, was the first to appear. And then Professor Royce's "The Feud of Oakfield Creek" came. This has had a large sale, and it is stated that a second edition will be put through the press. Of works that are of particular value to the University is a volume of 407 pages, written by Francis H. Brown, M. D., of the class of 1857. It is entitled "Harvard University in the War of 1861-65." It is a record of the services rendered in the army and navy of the United States by the graduates and students of Harvard College and the professional schools. The University, owing to its great prominence, has figured considerably in many novels. "The Scene of Frankley," by Henri Greville, is laid in part at Harvard. "In the Bostonians," by Henry James, there is description of the college exterior in one of the principal chapters. The scenes of the first part of Howells's "April Hopes" is a Harvard Class Day. In addition to the bibliographical contributions enumerated above, there have been almost numberless pamphlets and reports from the various departments of the University; outlines and grinds in the various history and political economy courses, public lectures, and the publications caused by the commemoration of the 250th anniversary. There has been a marked increase in the publication on law and sociology, theology and philology; but a deplorable falling off in archaeology and antiquities. The year, as a whole, has been decidedly fruitful, and the University has been keeping pace with the demands of modern civilization. Statistics show that she has been taking the lead of all other American colleges in disseminating knowledge to the English speaking race.

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