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Ibsen's Lady of the Sea.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The November number of the Monthly which appears today contains two acts of Ibsen's play "The Lady of the Sea" translated by Mr. George R. Carpenter; the last two acts to be published in the December number. This is the first English translation of this much talked of social drama. Ibsen stands today for the protest against the complicated mechanical drama so much in vogue, in place of which he gives us plays deepening for their interest on the steady development of one strong and simple the me. His work and his theory have been the subject of sharp discussion in England, and since the production of "A Doll's House" in Boston last month, the interest here is scarcely less. Indeed there is some danger of an Ibsen cult equal to the recent Browning craze. But whatever may be thought of Ibsen's artistic principle, the power of his work is unquestioned, and "The Lady of the Sea" is at present of special interest because in it Ibsen suggests answers to the problems proposed by him in "A Doll's House."

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