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The success of the second winter meeting showed clearly the advisability of inviting outside competition. By their beautiful exhibition of gymnastics the visitors added greatly to the interest of the meeting, and furthermore they have probably added something to Harvard athletics. Strange as it may seem, there is at present in college very little active enthusiasm in gymnasium athletics, such as contests on the flying rings, parallel bars, and the like. What interest there is in this kind of sport is good, but it is confined to a very small circle. One of the best ways to broaden this interest is by setting before the college an example of the perfection to which this sport can be carried. It is hard to go ahead blindly to arouse an interest in something about which one knows very little and consequently cares very little; but as soon as a vivid example of what the sport is and the excellence which can be attained in it is set before the eye, then the interest is of itself awakened. By adding the invitation events to the programme of the meeting on Saturday, the Athletic Association not only contributed much toward the success and enjoyment of the meeting, but took a very wholesome step in the promotion of athletics at Harvard.

By this same reasoning it might be argued that as there is a very faint interest in sparring and wrestling at college, this interest should be aroused by exhibitions of sparring and wrestling by outside champions. Theoretically this ought to be so. An ideal exhibition of sparring - sparring, not for blood, but for points - where quickness and skill should be the qualities to be exercised and to determine the winner, such an exhibition of sparring would doubtless do much to arouse an interest in the sport here at Harvard. But, unfortunately, such an exhibition of ideal sparring is hard to find. The moment one looks for champions outside the college, he is apt to hit upon something bordering very closely on professionalism. We doubt very much if such a principle of invitation could be extended to such sports as sparring and wrestling, without running a great risk of lowering the standard of Harvard athletics.

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