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George William Sawin.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Harvard college has lost one of the ablest of its younger men in George William Sawin, A. B., A. M., instructor in mathematics of the college and of the Annex, who died from the effects of a surgical operation at the Massachusetts General Hospital last Sunday morning. Mr. Sawin was born at Natick, Mass., October 12, 1860, and entered Exeter at the age of seventeen, where he supported himself largely by his own effort. Graduating from Exeter with the highest honors he entered Harvard in the class of 1884. At graduation he received a degree summa cum laude, was given an A. M. shortly after, and following this was appointed instructor in mathematics, which position he held at the time of his death.

In 1888 Mr. Sawin was chosen a member of the faculty. During his instructorship he prepared in collaboration with Professor George W. Wentworth, his teacher at Exeter, a high school algebra and an advanced geometry, both of which are recognized as valuable text books by teachers of advanced mathematics. At the time of his death Mr. Sawin was a member of the city council of Cambridge. Surely no instructor at Harvard was beloved by the students more than Mr. Sawin. At once agreeable and dignified, he won his way to the hearts of all. He, more than almost any other of the younger men, seemed to fill the gap between faculty and students, and his loss will be severely felt by both alike.

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