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The October Outing.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The present number of this admirable magazine contains so many interesting articles that it is not possible to notice them all. There is nothing in the number that is not well up to the usual high standard of the Outing articles, while the number and variety of the pieces make the number unusually interesting. Rancho del Muerto is a serial story begun this month. The scene is laid in Arizona and the work is in the best style of romantic story telling. Following this is a pretty little poem entitled "Recompense," by Annie L. Brakenridge; the "Pheasant in Old Britain," by Charles Turner; a very amusing story called "After Muskalonge and wall-eyed Pike," by K. D. Peterson, describing fishing adventures in Wisconsin. The first of a series of articles on wrestling is contributed by E. Hitchcock, Jr. The writer tells us something of the similarity of ancient and modern wrestling which is quite instructive. Another instructive article on "Women and their Cameras" is by Margaret Bisland. We are told how a woman can begin and perfect herself in photography and how many of them have done so. Athletics in Washington, by Herbert Janvrin Browne, is a useful contribution of some historic value. Besides these are several pleasant contributions on yachting, shooting, canoeing, cycling; besides something about the "National Guard of Minnesota," by E. F. Glenn, some verses on the "Pebble and the Star." by H. C. Kirk, and "Our Monthly Record," which contains much useful information in regard to sports of all kinds.

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