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North American Review.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The October number of the North American Review is emphatically a good one. The most important contributions are both by Englishmen: James Bryce has something to say about the Speaker's prerogatives in the House of Commons and in the House of Representatives and describes the history of parliamentary obstruction in England: John Morley has a final word on the discussion between Secretary Balfour and Mr. Parnell.

Valuable also are Minister Romero's concluding article on the Pan-American Conference and E. L. Godkin's "Key to Municipal Reform." Michael Davitt discusses the tendencies of labor in Great Britain; ex-President. White of Cornell adds an article to the much debated question of higher instruction in America and the future of the second-class "Universities" with which the country is surfeited. John Burroughs leaves his country scenes to talk of "Faith" and "Credullty." Madame A dam and G. P. A. Healey gossip about subjects with which they are respectively less and more familiar; while Professor Shaler, who turns off magazine articles with astonishing ease, writes on "The Peculiarities of the South."

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