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Book Review.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

"In a Club Corner" is the title of the latest work of Mr. A. P. Russell, the author of "A Club of One," "Library Notes," etc. It is the "monologue of a man who might have been sociable," and is fully up to the author's earlier works: the subjects touched are extremely interesting, and cover almost every field of human thought. The book, however, contains very little original matter; it is merely an excellent proof of the extent of Mr. Russel's careful reading. Almost each conversation-and there are about sixty in all-is composed entirely of short anecdote and sayings, illustrative of the author's remarks. For instance, the very first conversation, entitled "conversation," is a series of anecdotes and experiences told by, or happening to, celebrated personages, all tending to show the value of the power of conversation. Perhaps the two most interesting talks are those on Garrick and Sheridan; they are nothing more than anecdote after anecdote, no critical analysis of the men: still they cannot fail to impress the reader. Here and there we find a touch of orginality, perhaps in no conversation more than in "essays in titles."

[In a Club Corner. By A. P. Russell. 1 vol. Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1890. 328 pp. $1.25,]

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