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Rovers 4; Olympics 1.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The game between the Rovers and Olympics on Jarvis field Saturday was seen by about fifty students. Those who saw it were surprised at the amount of skill shown by the players, who in spite of being mostly workmen who can get off only only or two afternoons in the week to practise, had been used to the game so long as to have a great deal of prowess. Several men who came up with the team. The opinions of those who saw the game were various. Some who had not played foot ball thought the game rather tame and monotonous. Those who had played American foot ball thought it would be good fun. Nearly all agreed that it would be as interesting a game to play as our game but not so good to look at.

Several athletic men were impressed with the idea that it would make a first rate winter sport. There are a great many days in the winter when the ground is frozen and the air bracing, and these days could be utilized by any who like the sport to go out and play a little. It is by no means necessary to have eleven men on each side. Four or five on each side can play a game and have a great deal of fun out of it. The game is excellent for the wind and develops quickness and steadiness on the feet to a great degree. The crews for instance might play sometimes for half an hour or so when the weather is good and get splendid exercise in a much more agreeable way than running up North Avenue. The same may be said of the nine and the Mott Haven men; while if the game were once well started here there would be large numbers of students who would take every opportunity to go out and kick the ball. It is by no means necessary to play a hard game to get pleasure out of it, for in association foot ball merely kicking and bunting the ball affords so much chance for skill that even two men may amuse themselves in playing against each other.

In short it is an excellent game to play but rather uninteresting to watch. It is a game which a great number of men might play with more ease than almost any other were it once thoroughly established.

The game last Saturday showed that team play will win association foot ball as well as any other game. The Rovers won apparently simply on their being able to play together better than their opponents. The teams took their positions as follows:

ROVERS. OLYMPICS.

D. Shea. Goal. E. Bowden.

J. King. Full-back. O. Mayes.

J.Buckley (capt.) Full-back. S. Burgess.

G. Colligan. Half-back. J. Whittaker.

H. Waring. Half-back. A. L. Pilling.

G. Adams. Half-back. T. Moore.

T. Kennedy. Left Wing. J. Baylon.

P. Gavan. Left Wing. J. W. Randall.

H. Wilde. Right Wing. G. H. Ingham.

R. Bell. Right Wing. J. Finlay (capt.)

J. Mercer. Centre. J. Whitehead,

Thos. Burke. Umpire. T. Taylor.

A. Johnson, Referee.

At the beginning of the game it was evident that the Rovers were doing better work though it took them a good while to score. The ball travelled from one end of the field to the other several times before any scoring was done. The Olympics generally forced it down by means of one or two players, who, when they got down near their opponents' goal were quite unable to make a good try for goal. The Rovers when they returned the ball seemed to use nearly all their men. After about 15 minutes play the Rovers scored a goal very prettily. A second goal was scored by Mercer in a few more minutes, after which the Olympics took a considerable brace and by some very fine individual work scored a goal. The half ended with the score 2 to 1 in favor of the Rovers.

In the second half the Rovers had it all their own way and scored two more goals. Kennedy and Bell each kicked a goal and toward the end of the game the Olympics seemed to lose some of their snap. The game ended about 4 o'clock with the score 4 to 1.

Throughout the game was very lively and the players went at their work with a great deal of dash, and had the teams been backed up by crowds of enthusiastic followers the game would have been by no means without excitement.

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