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The Atlantic Monthly.

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

The March Atlantic has an even more literary character that usual. Four articles only, out of the sixteen of the table of contents, relate to anything else than literature, relate to anything else than literature. These are, "Dangers from Electricity," by Professor John Trowbridge, "Woman's Suffrage Pro and Con," "A Forgotten Episode," and "Lottering Through the Paris Exposition." These four evidently are the politics, science and art to which with literature, the Atlantic announces its devotion. The woman's suffrage paper is slightly "pro" and very much "con," but produces nothing new in argument, or any old truth in a new light. The electricity paper is really not alarming, as the chief danger seems to be from human carelessness and not electrical viciousness. The Paris exhibition paper is clever and brilliant, but somewhat too picturesque, as when we are pictured a woman of "pony build and fruity complextion, and aquiline features with sharp spirited curves." The impression resulting from such a description is more picturesque than definite.

The leading article of the month is a scholarly account of the Trial, Opinions and Death of Giordano Bruno, by William R. Thayer. The story of "opinions" is particularly lucid and interesting. "Emerson would have been condemned by that Inquisition," says Mr. Thayer, "for two of his sentences." The Value of the Corner, by G. P. Lathrop, is one of those discussive essays upon nothing in particular and many things in general, such as Lamb delighted in. There is nothing else Lamb-like, however, in Mr. Lathrop's theory of the advantages for solitude of a corner. "A Forgotten Episode," is a story of Indian wrongs by Americans fifty years ago known to history as the "Spoliation of the Cherokees." Over the Teacups is as bright as ever but somewhat more sharp. Dr. Holmes cannot resist swinging his Damascus blade over literary aspirants who have nothing but aspiration. The three long stories roll on serenely, and critical, semicritical, and uncritical treatment of Tennyson, Lucy Laroom and Mrs. Cheney's Miss Alcott with The Contributor's club complete the number.

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