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In presenting this morning the first issue of THE HERALD-CRIMSON, it seems as if it were due to ourselves if not to our readers, to offer some explanation for the recent consolidation of the Harvard Daily Herald and the Crimson. Although both papers had made for themselves a place in the college world, and although it might have been quite possible to carry them both on successfully, it was deemed best by the boards of both papers to effect a consolidation, and by uniting their interests to form a new paper, which, while naturally partaking of much of the character of the former publications, would yet be free from many of the disadvantages under which they labored, and would possess a much wider range of possibilities than was open to either the Herald or the Crimson. We believe that a first-class college daily is now almost a necessity, and we also believe that it is possible to maintain one here at Harvard. It will therefore be our endeavor to make THE HERALD-CRIMSON first-class in every particular, and a fit representative paper for Harvard. We shall do our utmost to maintain a high tone throughout its columns, and to keep it up to the times in every particular. Of course it will be quite impossible for us to attain the standard we have set before us unless we can receive the support of the students, but that we shall obtain this support we have little doubt, provided we do our utmost to deserve it.

We are very much inclined to believe that the consolidation of the Herald and Crimson will aid the literary interests of the college in more than one way. The very fact that the number of papers published in the college is reduced to three will benefit them all financially, while it will remove all clashing of interests and allow to each paper its own separate field. The Lampoon represents our wit, the Advocate our wisdom, and THE HERALD-CRIMSON our news. That there is room for literary merit in the columns of a college daily is our firm conviction, and we shall, while refraining from trespassing on the grounds of the Advocate and Lampoon, endeavor to combine prose, poetry, and news in such proportion as will be acceptable to our readers for their daily edification and enjoyment. In conclusion we would say that the columns of THE HERALD-CRIMSON are open to all members of the university, and we shall hope continually that they may avail themselves of the opportunity to share their knowledge and ignorance, joy and sorrow with their fellow students.

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