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It is rather a curious illustration of the barriers which conventional boundary lines may create, that Canada is represented in this college by only three students. The Pacific slope, which is ten times farther away, sends thirty students here; the city of San Francisco alone has twenty-two. And yet there is probably as large a well-to-do class in either Montreal or Quebec as there is in the American city. The great difficulty about attracting Canadian students to this country is, that a college is almost entirely deprived of the most effective means of overcoming international prejudice and conservatism - advertising. A college can not, or from motives of professional etiquette, will not avail itself of the methods, which, for instance, have brought success to Mr. Pear, the soapman, or Mr. Redfern, the clothesman, or any of the other eminent advertisers who sell their wares in foreign markets. The college, however, is not entirely without resources. It can keep itself before the eye of the student public in a quiet, though not ineffective way. Last year, for example, the Ecole Politique of Paris, had one of its circulars posted for some months in the entry of University Hall; and the circular undoubtedly had some influence upon the four or five Harvard men who are at present studying in that school. Our own authorities might find a similar step profitable. The reasons which take Americans abroad to study ought also to apply to Canadians with reference to this country.

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